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Thread: Overnight Trips

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Maryville, TN
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    64

    Default Overnight Trips

    I've been wanting to start taking some overnight trips and I've been looking at gear. The list of camping gear is very overwhelming. I've already decided on using a hammock instead of a tent. What it comes down to is the smaller items. What I'm looking for is the essentials. I don't really plan on doing more than a night or two seeing how I'm solo most of the time.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Knoxville
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    1,168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float On View Post
    I've been wanting to start taking some overnight trips and I've been looking at gear. The list of camping gear is very overwhelming. I've already decided on using a hammock instead of a tent. What it comes down to is the smaller items. What I'm looking for is the essentials. I don't really plan on doing more than a night or two seeing how I'm solo most of the time.
    I am also new to the backpacking experience, as I went on my first one a little over a month ago. However, I built my gear list using the REI checklist as a starting point. Of course I added and subtracted from it to suit my needs. I then developed a spreadsheet that lists all my gear and weights of each so I can determine how much I am carrying before I get everything packed. Below is the link to the REI checklist:

    http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advi...checklist.html

    Like most everything in our sport you can make your gear list as complicated, simple, cheap, or expensive as you like.

    One thing to remember when doing a backpacking fishing trip, is that fishing gear weights can add up quickly. Wading boots (>2.5 lbs), fly boxes (8 oz), reel (8 oz), etc. What surprised me this past weekend while car camping in the park was how many people were wearing waders. Save yourself the trouble if backpacking and leave the waders at home, you don't need them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, Tennessee
    Posts
    1,542

    Smile

    Here are a couple of good ones I like. They are from a guy who does mainly smokies trips.

    Cheap one http://www.lytw8.com/uploads/Cheap_U..._Gear_List.pdf

    http://www.lytw8.com/uploads/REI_Ult..._Gear_List.pdf Sub 10 pound rei

    I'd look at weight and buy a postal scale

    Let us know if you have any specific questions

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Seymour, TN
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Those links all look pretty good. So outfitting totally depends on what you want to do, and how much you want to spend. Some things I would add to this is when you buy, especially the more expensive items, think about getting gear that will be useful for anything you might plan on doing.

    Backpacks: if all you are ever going to do is overnighters, just by a daypack with lash points to attach gear. If you plan on doing anything longer, go with a bigger pack. If you pack carefully, you can pack for a week long trip in a medium sized bag. The really large bags are too heavy for an overnighter, not to mention that you would probably have to pack extra un-necessary stuff just to keep you gear from slopping around while you hike.

    Stoves: how are you going to eat? Are you just going to do things like cup-a-soups/ramens? Then save money and weight with an alcohol stove or a Sterno stove. If you plan on more gourmet stylings, there are lots of options, and they can be expensive.

    You said you are planning on a hammock, so we won't talk about tents. Hammocks will save you on a lot of weight, so that is good.

    Sleeping bag: remember it can get pretty cool in the park at night, so plan accordingly.

    Hydration: I don't care for the taste of tablets, so I have a water filter. Tablets are initially cheaper and lighter, but I have had the same filter (ceramic type) for years, and no problems.

    Here are some other tips. For a plate - frisbee. It's a plate and entertainment. Farm fresh eggs do not need to be refrigerated for up to a week. The hard part for that is keeping them from cracking, so pack carefully. Pack everything in zip-locks, this will help protect things from getting wet (or eggs on them if you didn't pack well) and make it easier to find stuff without unpacking your whole pack. If you do lash things to the outside of your pack, like your wading boots, lash them tightly. If they are swinging back and forth, it wastes your energy. Keep things compact and tight.

    Hope this was somewhat helpful.
    later
    Dan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Maryville, TN
    Posts
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    Default

    Thank you guys for posting. It's all extremely helpful.

    I do own a Gregory z30 pack. I'm afraid it's not big enough or maybe I should learn to pack things in better. I think I can make an overnight trip with it but I'm not sure I could fit 2 days into it.

    I've was looking into Clark Hammocks but the price is a bit steep for me at the moment. I've fallen back to looking at the Hennessy Asym Hammock.

    I tend to go a little overboard when it comes to first aid, if there is such a thing. I've even consider taking a class in "backcountry first aid". I believe in Murphy's Law.

    Now that I have a general idea of the things I need to take with me, what are the things you wouldn't leave without? The frisbee idea is great. Wouldn't have thought of that one. It always seems to be the little things that you forget and that i want to avoid if possible.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Maryville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float On View Post
    I tend to go a little overboard when it comes to first aid, if there is such a thing. I've even consider taking a class in "backcountry first aid".

    .................. It always seems to be the little things that you forget and that i want to avoid if possible.
    Once you get started, you'll soon learn that it's the little things that you never use and should have just left at home.

    A first aid class would be great. There's no use in taking first aid supplies when you don't know how to use them. But, my first aid kit consists of a space blanket, 2 aspirin, 2 Benadryl's, a small tube of super glue and about half a dozen wraps of duck tape on a walking stick. If something happens to you that you can't fix with that, you're going to have to come off the mountain anyways.

    I never weigh anything anymore. Being in my 40's, I go for comfort. I figure I can always run a few more miles each week to make up for it. Most of my backpacking is for 7-10 days at a stretch where I/we pack into a base camp and hunt out of it. I do relatively few overnight night trips for fishing. If I did more short trips, I might be more concerned about weight, but my overnighters for fishing are more of a test run for my backcountry hunting set-up.



    The 5 gallon bucket was found in a meadow in the Holy Cross Wilderness. It was full of candy!!!
    My posts are worthless without pictures

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