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Thread: New Species: Bigmouth Buffalo

  1. #1
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    Default New Species: Bigmouth Buffalo

    I've heard lots of stories about people catching these fish before but never found them myself. Wednesday was the first time I had found them in numbers. Talk about a lot of fun. My arm is still sore! The crazy thing is they were taking a #22 gray midge. I'm still not sure if they were eating it or if it was coincidence. Any buffalo experts out there? Will these fish eat something that small? Anyway it was cool to add a new species to the list.





    The trout fishing was pretty good too but finding a window without generation is still challenging. This should be a good year on all of our tailwaters with the cold winter we had providing lots of cold water for the summer!
    "Then He said to them, 'Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.'" Matthew 4:19

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  2. #2
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    David just read your post, went to Knoxnews to check today's news and this was on their site

    Photo by Adam Lau
    Two male smallmouth buffalo hover together in Citico Creek in the Cherokee National Forest on Friday, April 11, 2014, while waiting for females to join them for their annual spring spawning run. Males turn slate-blue as they near the event's peak. (ADAM LAU/NEWS SENTINEL)






    Buffalo run in Citico Creek
    VONORE — The dogwoods were in bloom, the warblers were singing, and America toads were sounding their soft, trilling mating calls along the river bank.
    But the most dramatic sign of spring that day was the thousands of smallmouth buffalo — a member of the sucker family — making their annual spawning run up the crystal clear, knee-deep waters of Citico Creek. The 5- to 15-pound fish hovered over the gravel stream bottom in massive schools. From the bank, their dark silhouettes could easily be mistaken for river rocks as they faced upstream in equilibrium to the current.
    Every year in early April the buffalo make a spectacular spawning run from Tellico Lake up Citico Creek. They spawn in other East Tennessee streams, too, but nowhere are they as bunched up and as visible as in Citico Creek, which flows through the Cherokee National Forest in Monroe County.
    “There are very few places where you can go and see such large concentrations of big fish in a synchronous spawn,” said J.R. Shute, co-owner of Conservation Fisheries, a private hatchery in Knoxville that raises small, imperiled fish. “The only thing I can compare it to is the salmon run out West.”
    Photo by Adam Lau // Buy this photo
    J.R. Shute, co-director of Conservation Fisheries, Inc., uses a camera while looking for smallmouth buffalo spawning action in Citico Creek in the Cherokee National Forest on Friday, April 11, 2014. (ADAM LAU/NEWS SENTINEL)


    Last Friday a News Sentinel reporter and photographer drove down to Citico Creek with wet suits and snorkeling gear. The buffalo were concentrated along gravel shoals a little less than one mile above Tellico Lake, but most of the fish were males. The females, it seemed, were still staging downstream at the mouth of Citico Creek, waiting for the magical combination of water temperature to trigger their spawning run.
    The water temperature that day was 55 degrees.
    A check-back Sunday showed there was spawning activity. What appeared to be large, dark blotches along the edge of the stream actually would be schools of smallmouth buffalos. Every once in a while a female broke ranks and darted toward mid-channel with several males in hot pursuit. Pressing up against the female, the males released their reproductive milt, and as the female broadcast her eggs, the surface of Citico Creek came to a boil.
    Since 2000 the U.S. Forest Service has been promoting recreational snorkeling on the Conasauga River in southeast Tennessee and Citico Creek. Both bodies are home to critically endangered fish species, and both have exceptional water quality thanks to the buffering effect of the surrounding Cherokee National Forest.
    It’s a different world as soon as your face mask slips beneath the water. The creek that day was packed with smallmouth and black buffalo. The males — slightly smaller than the females — fairly pulsated as they displayed their blue-steel breeding color. The buffalo paid little attention to the journalists snorkeling among them. They had more important things on their minds. Also spawning that day, but less numerous, were carpsuckers and redhorse.
    Photo by Adam Lau // Buy this photo
    Smallmouth buffalo crowd the shallows of Citico Creek in the Cherokee National Forest on Sunday, April 13, 2014, during their spring spawning run. (ADAM LAU/NEWS SENTINEL)


    Some people snagged the buffalo with treble hooks from the bank, while others waded out and bow-fished for them with specialized archery equipment. The flesh of buffalo is mild and white; the problem is the tiny, free-floating bones that are lodged in the meat. Some people dissolve the bones by pressure cooking. Another method is to eat the ribs, which are bone-free.
    Quentin Bass, archaeologist for the Cherokee National Forest, says the Cherokee Indians and their ancestors relied on the annual buffalo run for much-needed protein after the long, hard winter. According to Bass, the archaeological evidence dates to about 2000 B.C. and includes funnel-shaped fish traps built of rocks; notched pebbles used as sinkers; and fire-cracked rocks where Indians cooked their buffalo along the river bank.
    The spawn lasts only a few days. The adhesive eggs are the size of BBs and so abundant that in some places the bottom of Citico Creek as seen through a snorkel mask looked covered in snow. In a week to 10 days, the eggs hatch, and the buffalo larvae are swept downstream to Tellico Lake.
    Jim Herrig, fisheries biologist for the Cherokee National Forest, said an estimated 50,000 buffalo and other sucker species swim up Citico Creek and produce about 25,000 pounds of eggs.
    “The best way to view them is to get in the water and swim right with them,” Herrig said. “This is an event everyone should see.”

    © 2014 Knoxville News Sentinel. All rights reserved. This material may not be
    Last edited by bigsur; 04-18-2014 at 03:32 PM.
    "It starts with a raindrop, don't let it end with a teardrop!"

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  3. #3
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    Wow that is some good information there! Thanks for the insight. Helps me know a little more about these fish now. Guess I must have timed it just right as that article said it only lasts a few days...
    "Then He said to them, 'Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.'" Matthew 4:19

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  4. #4
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    I think you were at what was known in the 1960's and 70's as a love-in!

    Power to the fish! Dude!
    Last edited by bigsur; 04-18-2014 at 08:12 PM.
    "It starts with a raindrop, don't let it end with a teardrop!"

    "Nothing straightens out my mind like a twisting mountain stream!"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsur View Post
    I think you were at what was known in the 1960's and 70's as a love-in!

    Power to the fish! Dude!

    Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll, and gray size 22 midges

    David now you have another specie to fear you

    Thanks for sharing
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  6. #6
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    When you were talking about the generation schedule I'm guessing that that the bigmouth buffalo you caught was not in the the park. Being that buffalo are members of the sucker family it wouldn't surprise that they would take midge larva. Food habit studies of smallmouth and bigmouth buffalo in TVA reservoirs have shown that insect larva are included in their diets.
    Personally I've caught white suckers and redhorse while drifting nymphs. I wouldn't be surprised at all if they would take a size 22 gray nymph.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by softhackle View Post
    Food habit studies of smallmouth and bigmouth buffalo in TVA reservoirs have shown that insect larva are included in their diets.
    Personally I've caught white suckers and redhorse while drifting nymphs. I wouldn't be surprised at all if they would take a size 22 gray nymph.
    Interesting! Do you by chance have a link to those studies or are they available online? I'm always intrigued to read stuff like that...
    "Then He said to them, 'Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.'" Matthew 4:19

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Knapp View Post
    Interesting! Do you by chance have a link to those studies or are they available online? I'm always intrigued to read stuff like that...
    Sorry, I don't have a link. I know that one of the papers was published in the the Tennessee Academy of Science around 1976 or so.. You may try googling them. Also part of my Masters thesis at Tennessee Tech was about the food habits of the smallmouth buffalo in TVA and Corps of Engineers Reservoirs. If you check with the Tennessee Cooperative Fisheries Unit at Tennessee Tech University, they may have a copy of it. It should be from around 1976 or so. Also check out the journal "Transactions of the American fisheries Society" If you have google scholar there may be more information.
    Good luck with your search.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by softhackle View Post
    Sorry, I don't have a link. I know that one of the papers was published in the the Tennessee Academy of Science around 1976 or so.. You may try googling them. Also part of my Masters thesis at Tennessee Tech was about the food habits of the smallmouth buffalo in TVA and Corps of Engineers Reservoirs. If you check with the Tennessee Cooperative Fisheries Unit at Tennessee Tech University, they may have a copy of it. It should be from around 1976 or so. Also check out the journal "Transactions of the American fisheries Society" If you have google scholar there may be more information.
    Good luck with your search.
    Thanks! Those details should help. I'll have to do some check around now...
    "Then He said to them, 'Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.'" Matthew 4:19

    Guided Fly Fishing with David Knapp
    The Trout Zone Blog
    contact: TroutZoneAnglers at gmail dot com

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