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Thread: Snp 9/30/17

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Knoxville/Green River, KY
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    289

    Default Snp 9/30/17

    Got to fish the Shenandoah National Park yesterday for the first time.

    I will say that it is as dry up here as it is in TN. Due to work putting me in VA for a bit, I decided to get out and give it a shot.

    I was able to hit the Rapidan inside the park and caught several nice brookies, especially by our standards. These northern brookies are a bit larger than what I am used to in the GSMNP.

    My first fish on and landed was an 11" male. I caught several others in the 6-8" range and one of my last ones was a nice 10" female. I will say their color doesn't match ours, but they are nice fish as well. The male had a nice large hooked jaw and a slight humpback. Even with the low water I was able to catch and release about a dozen or so.

    Early in the morning, the green weenie was the one they liked but as the sun got up and it warmed, they went for the yellow stimulator I had as the indicator fly. Early on, the temp was in the mid 40's and by the end of the day the mid to upper 60's. I will also add, the road in to the Rapidan is rough, rougher than anything in the GSMNP or South Cherokee NF.

    If anyone can make it up, it's certainly worth it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Halifax, VA
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    793

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    Nice! I've fished up there, and several other places around and between Staunton and Amherst. If you get over toward Edinburg go by and see Murray's shop there. I don't think anyone ever replied when I mentioned catching
    10 inch Brookies on the board several years ago! They're there, but like you say, they may be a little different strain although the fish down around Buena Vista look to me like the GSMNP Brookie.
    <(((>< In tribute to Ben, Duck Hunter extraordinaire, and man's best friend.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Knoxville/Green River, KY
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    I was wondering where the demarcation was for the southern and northern strains, but was maybe thinking close to the NC/VA border. It would be interesting to know, I would also figure there is no real static line but then again who knows. Perhaps someone with more of an idea could chime in.

    Another thing I noticed with the Rapidan is how clear the water is, as clear as the Smokies that I could see.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Knoxville, Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayR View Post
    I was wondering where the demarcation was for the southern and northern strains, but was maybe thinking close to the NC/VA border. It would be interesting to know, I would also figure there is no real static line but then again who knows. Perhaps someone with more of an idea could chime in.

    Another thing I noticed with the Rapidan is how clear the water is, as clear as the Smokies that I could see.

    It's pretty simple. If the stream eventually flows into the Mississippi it Southern, if it ends in the Atlantic its Northern
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Halifax, VA
    Posts
    793

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckypaddler View Post
    It's pretty simple. If the stream eventually flows into the Mississippi it Southern, if it ends in the Atlantic its Northern
    Thanks Ducky, I had no idea of that. So the fish I was referring to would still be northern strain, but, there are still several that I fish on down through Saltville, VA that do
    flow out to the south and west.
    <(((>< In tribute to Ben, Duck Hunter extraordinaire, and man's best friend.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hillbilly Hollow, NC
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    1,072

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckypaddler View Post
    It's pretty simple. If the stream eventually flows into the Mississippi it Southern, if it ends in the Atlantic its Northern
    That's a pretty good start, but of course there are some exceptions. In order for a population to be pure Southern stain there needs to be some kind of physical barriers (i.e. waterfall or cascade) to keep out the Northern yankee aggressors. I've caught many Northern strain brook trout in watersheds in the park where they were stocked into a stream or reservoir outside of the park and migrated upstream. I believe the theory is these fish were left behind during the last ice age. Much of the research that I've seen shows most populations of brook trout have mixed genetics. The true Southern strain is indeed becoming a rare bird.
    Last edited by flyman; 10-04-2017 at 09:26 PM. Reason: 42
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