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Thread: Horseshoe question?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Lafayette, TN
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    109

    Question Horseshoe question?

    Iím planning on fishing the horseshoe this summer. I know I need to start early and plan for slick rocks and bailing out so I donít have to accidentally spend the night. Iím wanting to park on Cadeís cove side and hike in. Iím thinking I should plan on hiking across the ridge and start fishing the far side of the shoe so that I will be fishing back towards the parking lot the whole time. Which direction do you guys suggest fishing and why? Any tips or suggestions? Special gear choices? Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    thanks in advance,
    hNt
    When I see a mountain stream, all my troubles and worries seem to flow downstream, leaving me peaceful and serene. I then immediately start fishing, upstream.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2015
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    Knoxville/Green River, KY
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    Fishing alone or with someone?

    How old are you? Pretty good physical shape?

    many years ago I fished the Horseshoe, I was in my 20’s and it was not easy. No way I would attempt it now in my 50’s.

    what makes it difficult to get there early is the loop road doesn’t open until the bikes get done, forget the exact time, but it slows you up getting back to the Abrams Falls parking lot. I see now it’s only on saturdays and Wednesday’s that it’s not open until 10, I would make sure you were there welll before they open it to get in line so as to be back there as early as you can.

    Back when I did it, I drove in on Parsons Branch off of 129 road even though it was only one way out. Back then there was no gate. I got to the parking lot super early and it still took me most of the day. Doubt anyone could get by doing that now

  3. #3
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    Sep 2015
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    I fish the horseshoe or little shoe twice a year. Really good fishing but donít underestimate the stretches in the beginning of the trailhead before the first ridge and water after the big shoe.

    If you plan on fishing the big shoe then start walking the Abrams trailhead and climb over the first ridge and then keep walking another 10 minutes and right before the trail starts to rise again over a second ridge get in.

    From here this will take you 9 hours to fish and thatís if you are constantly moving. Iíd start around 8 am so you can be out by 5-6pm

  4. #4
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    Mar 2009
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    Lafayette, TN
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    I am 46 and in fair shape. I hike and backpack some and try to stay active, although I can certainly tell a difference between now and 20 years ago. The thing is, with me starting to tell a difference I want to make this trip before I am not able. I will be alone to, but I have a SPOT device that can signal for help from the backcountry. I been thinking about a GPS so that I would be able to judge how far along I am and keep an eye on my time so as not to run out of daylight, but those things are expensive.
    When I see a mountain stream, all my troubles and worries seem to flow downstream, leaving me peaceful and serene. I then immediately start fishing, upstream.

  5. #5
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    Mar 2015
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    Knoxville/Green River, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by hungNtree View Post
    I am 46 and in fair shape. I hike and backpack some and try to stay active, although I can certainly tell a difference between now and 20 years ago. The thing is, with me starting to tell a difference I want to make this trip before I am not able. I will be alone to, but I have a SPOT device that can signal for help from the backcountry. I been thinking about a GPS so that I would be able to judge how far along I am and keep an eye on my time so as not to run out of daylight, but those things are expensive.
    I would also recommend you take a life straw or equivalent and what little gear you might need if you do end up the night. Going in June will afford you the longest daylight hours which is a help.

    As as for the rocks, what makes Abrams really difficult (at least for me) are the slanted rock ledges that are common there. Those things are like an ice rink but on an incline. They are also covered in a fine layer of super slick silt. Studs might help, I just have felt.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hungNtree View Post
    I been thinking about a GPS so that I would be able to judge how far along I am and keep an eye on my time so as not to run out of daylight, but those things are expensive.
    If you have an iPhone, iHike GPS is a great app that will locate you on a topo map with an accuracy of around 15 feet. It doesn't need a cell signal to operate, just the phone's built in GPS. There is no recurring subscription cost. I've been using it for several years and it has been great in the backcountry. I don't believe there is an android version, but there are probably comparable apps for android phones.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2008
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    Norris, TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayR View Post
    ......

    As as for the rocks, what makes Abrams really difficult (at least for me) are the slanted rock ledges that are common there. Those things are like an ice rink but on an incline. They are also covered in a fine layer of super slick silt. Studs might help, I just have felt.

    If you like hiking; you should enjoy fishing the horseshoe. Dress for hiking and backpack the rest. Footing is probably the most challenging thing for me in that area. I have never fell as often as I have in Abram's Creek. I would take an air horn and some bear spray. Go after it and let your family and friends know your plans and timelines.
    ďEvery human has four endowments- self awareness, conscience, independent will, & creative imagination.
    These give us the ultimate human freedom... The
    power
    to choose, to respond, to change



  8. #8
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    Mar 2009
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    Lafayette, TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWarrick View Post
    If you have an iPhone, iHike GPS is a great app that will locate you on a topo map with an accuracy of around 15 feet. It doesn't need a cell signal to operate, just the phone's built in GPS. There is no recurring subscription cost. I've been using it for several years and it has been great in the backcountry. I don't believe there is an android version, but there are probably comparable apps for android phones.
    Thatís awesome! Thanks so much, I didnít realize there was such an app. I donít know why, I just assumed no cell service meant nothing worked, Iím definitely getting this. $10 and no subscription, that canít be beat! Thanks again
    When I see a mountain stream, all my troubles and worries seem to flow downstream, leaving me peaceful and serene. I then immediately start fishing, upstream.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    138

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    I t is really impossible to overstate how slick those rocks are. I know of a broken arm and a broken shoulder from two different incidents, and thats just what I know about.

    Forty years ago a friend in ATL asked me to direct him to the "shoe "so he and his early teenage son could fish it one day. I did. I gave him every warning and all the trail instructions like you are getting from other posters. He and his son started mid morning. He was not in shape for it although he thought he was. He fell numerous times as did the boy, and both were soaking wet by noon.
    Perhaps it was poor physical condition, perhaps hypothermia, but for whatever reason he collapsed and literally could not walk a step. His son stayed with him ,but finally closer to dark, the son left him and went upstream to try to find his way out alone and get help for his dad. Eventually he found his way out but by then parking lot was closed and gates locked. Long story short he finally got help, and a rescue team of rangers went in that night and found the father after a long ordeal and carried him out . The rescue team fell in the water and on the slick rocks as well . It was a continuous ordeal for all involved . They came out long after daylight. He survived it. I have continued for my whole life to regret telling them how to do the trip.

    I tell you all of this because it can be a very dangerous place and certainly not one IMO to take on by yourself, or undertake casually.

  10. #10
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    Mar 2015
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    Knoxville/Green River, KY
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    As I recall, there was a body found last year around that area on Abrams. I never heard what he died from or how or whether he was a hiker, fisherman or whatever.

    Anyone know now the full details?

    Googled it and found this, but no subsequent info as to cause, etc.

    https://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/n...ark/102521044/

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