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Thread: Trolling in a Downpour

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    135

    Default Trolling in a Downpour

    Because of the forecast I headed out to spent most of Saturday trolling for trout in deep pools during heavy rain. Fortunately, a HEAVY downpour hit where I was fishing. The drops were falling so big and hard they were causing heavy splashes, breaking up the surface, helping to keep me hidden. This also made the water dingy and it started to rise. All together, this put the fish on the feed and they seemed a little less skittish. Using a large, heavy, black wooly-booger with a gold conehead, I trolled it thru the current in a deep pool which triggered a sudden slam that all but hooked itself. Still, I drove the hook a little deeper into the right corner of its jaw to improve the hook set. It used its WIDE tail to make some powerful runs screaming fly line off my reel on at least 3 occasions. I once fell into the current and thought I might have to swim with it, but I collected my balance and footing and continued the fight. After she gave her all, I slid her into my awaiting net. The massive struggle took a lot out of this girl, but I was able to revive her and watched her for what was about 15 mins gently fin in a side eddy as she regained her strength. (I'll try to load the video of her recovering). I was fortunate to have another good day for what's so far been a pretty good year for me in the Smokies.

    Jim Parks


    [IMG][/IMG]
    Last edited by Grampus; 08-19-2018 at 11:32 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Looks like you have had a really good year in the park. Well done again.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    135

    Default



    This is where I left her after getting her revived from her tough battle. I spent several minutes getting her going then watched probably another 10 minutes to make sure she was going to be OK. She'll be laying eggs in a few months!
    Last edited by Grampus; 08-21-2018 at 08:52 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Beautiful! When you say troll it, do you position yourself slightly upstream and you swing it through the pool while you strip? I hardly ever fish streamers but that's how I do it ... I might be employing the wrong technique though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoelO View Post
    Beautiful! When you say troll it, do you position yourself slightly upstream and you swing it through the pool while you strip? I hardly ever fish streamers but that's how I do it ... I might be employing the wrong technique though.
    JoelO, what you're describing is what I use a lot. However, I think sometimes stripping it is too much action. Often, I get a lot of "follows" but not many strikes. The previous Sunday afternoon, my wife accompanied me on an afternoon "hunting" trip. She read a book, while I stopped at various pools where I looked for larger trout by casting a wooly-booger and stripping it thru various deep pools. Often, this will get trout to show themselves as they follow out of curiosity, but won't strike. I noticed a good trout followed my streamer in this pool, so I returned. In this particular pool, I was able to stand in the current of the shoals above the big, deep pool. I cast into the slower current across and as it moved back into the current, I let it hang there for about 20 seconds using my rod to lift and drop the streamer. In looking at big pools over the years, I've noticed how smaller fish will often feed in the middle of the current keeping their position then they dart toward food. So, instead of imitating a "fleeing" minnow, I worked it like a small feeding minnow would move in the current. I also took into account the tint of the water. It wasn't muddy, but about 2 feet visibility so I moved the streamer around in the current using my rod tip to "dance" it around hoping to get a "flash view" to any large trout to entice a strike. Varying the retrieve often results in a sudden strike where a typical strip does not. In this case, the strike was so hard and deliberate, it essentially hooked itself. Still, I applied some pressure to drive the hook in deeper to maximize the hook set. This one wasn't as big as the one I caught a few weeks ago, but it's wide tail seemed to give it a LOT of power. That and the other was caught in some faster water and it bolted upstream, giving me the advantage. This one had a large pool to run around in with the current feeding down to a fallen tree, which was the only obstruction that had me worried.

    I'm in my 41st year of fishing the Smokies, and I still learn new techniques on how to improve strikes. I've been working on something new the past few months that's also bringing a lot of surprising strikes in my indicator method. I showed it to a friend who has also fished for years and at first he he doubtful until I caught 2 using it as I showed it to him. The thing to do is always be thinking outside the "norm". Fish don't always play by "their rules" and sometimes as fly fishermen, we must alter our presentation to entice a strike.

    Jim Parks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Love those hard hits! That's why I love to swing soft hackles from time to time...they pretty much hook themselves when they take it on the swing. I've already identified in my mind a couple of places I want to try your methods when brother and I go in September...we absolutely love going to the park but only make it over there a couple of times a year. Thanks for all your help.

    Joel

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    135

    Default

    And I hope you get caught in a downpour, the water gets dingy, and the trout go into a feeding frenzy!

    Jim Parks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    7

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    Grampus,

    Nice Brown! I’ve cruised around this forum for a while and finally decided to join. In reading some different threads, and some of yours, I’ve learned to try fishing in a little higher off colored water. I did that this Saturday and I have to say it was the best day I’ve had so far. I’ve only been flyfishing in the park, and overall freshwater, for a short time. I appreciate your tips and advice immensely. I fished a green weenie and a pheasant tail nymph combo and caught four rainbows. The green weenie was the winner. I thought about changing my name to “Chub Master” because I couldn’t keep them off my fly. Again, a very nice brown and thanks for sharing.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Glad I can help. If I can cut the learning curve of others by sharing my “experience”, then I’ve done what my early mentors did for me and pay it forward!

    Jim Parks

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Grampus,

    Most of my trout fishing education in the GSMNP is from the “school of hard knocks”! As stated before it is appreciated.

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