Home QLinks New Posts Members User CP Calendar FAQ

Go Back   Little River Outfitters Forum > Fly Fishing Board > Tennessee Trout Streams and Tailwaters

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-24-2009, 02:33 PM
Wilson10's Avatar
Wilson10 Wilson10 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Clinton, TN
Posts: 288
Default Efficient Fly Fishing(Tailwaters)

With Spring right around the corner I've began to ponder ways to help myself become a more efficient fly fisherman. Below are a couple things I want to do better. Please feel free to offer advice and also to share some things you want to do better. Or if you would like, you can simply offer advice for efficient tailwater fishing.

1. Become a better dry fly fisherman
2. Learn to locate better fish more consistently


These are just a couple off the top of my head. I'll be sure to add more later.

Thanks,
__________________
Adam
awilson1010@gmail.com

My Blog: Fly Fish East Tennessee
www.flyfisheasttennessee.blogspot.com

><>
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-24-2009, 03:29 PM
ChemEAngler's Avatar
ChemEAngler ChemEAngler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Knoxville
Posts: 1,137
Default

Just my two cents for fishing the tailwaters around here is to become very proficient using midges. Whether it be dries, larva, or pupae. Learning how to properly fish the correct midge imitation can mean the difference between a skunking and a fantastic day.

I spent last year working on the midge techniques, and it paid off. This year I am planning on working on my dry technique just like you. I think the first thing to concentrate on is mending and getting a perfect drift. IMO that is what makes the difference when fishing dries.
__________________
Travis

My Blog --> http://tnfishingfanatic.blogspot.com/

My Photo Site --> http://knxtravis80.zenfolio.com/

Email ChemEAngler
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-24-2009, 03:47 PM
flyred06's Avatar
flyred06 flyred06 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Gadsden, Alabama
Posts: 896
Default

fishing nymphs without indicators and mending. Also, slowing down. I tend to get myself worked up to quickly thinking more is better versus planning my next cast and letting my drift go all the way through without interupting it.
__________________
Romans 10:9-10 KJV
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-24-2009, 09:11 PM
psnapp psnapp is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Powell, TN
Posts: 219
Default

I, too, would add that fishing midges (including black fly patterns) in appropriate sizes and patterns with a drag-free drift is a key to successful tailwater fishing. Midges and crustaceans are tailwater staples, and the more proficient you become in presenting a "reasonable" pattern in a "reasonable" size, the more success you will have.

I would like to suggest another ingredient to the tailwater strategy mix -- streamers. Having a variety of sculpin, shad and general-purpose (eg buggers, zonkers, Barr and Gallup concoctions, etc) patterns in your arsenal and focusing on the lesser-fished areas can mean the difference in a so-so day and a super day. I (not to boast) have had some very good days on E Tenn tailwaters fishing streamers in not-so-popular areas when the overall fishing around me was lackluster.

Phil

Last edited by psnapp; 02-24-2009 at 11:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-25-2009, 12:29 AM
ajh10567's Avatar
ajh10567 ajh10567 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Knoxville
Posts: 139
Default

I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-25-2009, 12:52 AM
Wilson10's Avatar
Wilson10 Wilson10 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Clinton, TN
Posts: 288
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajh10567 View Post
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?

Not exactly what you were talking about but I was just reading about a 3 fly system of which have 3 different life cycles. Anyone used this before? Seemed interesting, but guaranteed to tangle on me. I have hard enough time with a 2 fly system.
__________________
Adam
awilson1010@gmail.com

My Blog: Fly Fish East Tennessee
www.flyfisheasttennessee.blogspot.com

><>
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-25-2009, 06:22 AM
92Esquire 92Esquire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 75
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajh10567 View Post
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?
Not quite the same, but I've spent some time fishing a weighted Zebra midge below a soft hackle before. Similar idea. I still picked up all of my fish on the Zebra, for what it is worth.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-04-2009, 01:51 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,197
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson10 View Post
1. Become a better dry fly fisherman

Thanks,
Just my .02, but scrap that if you want to be more efficient fishing tailwaters. I guess it depends on what you deem efficient. If it is putting fish to hand in numbers, quickly, then dries on our tailwaters are not really the way to go.

If you want to become lethal learn how to effectively present midges and other small nymphs. Learn the section you fish like the back of your hand and know every deep pocket, crease, slot, chute, whatever. Maximize your time on the river by putting the right fly, at the right depth, in the right places. And by all means keep it simple on the flies, when you wake up and know you only need 2 different nymphs to go to the river and be successful, a tuft of yarn, and a spool of tippet. Then you are there IMO.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-04-2009, 02:39 PM
Wilson10's Avatar
Wilson10 Wilson10 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Clinton, TN
Posts: 288
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by waterwolf View Post
Just my .02, but scrap that if you want to be more efficient fishing tailwaters. I guess it depends on what you deem efficient. If it is putting fish to hand in numbers, quickly, then dries on our tailwaters are not really the way to go.

If you want to become lethal learn how to effectively present midges and other small nymphs. Learn the section you fish like the back of your hand and know every deep pocket, crease, slot, chute, whatever. Maximize your time on the river by putting the right fly, at the right depth, in the right places. And by all means keep it simple on the flies, when you wake up and know you only need 2 different nymphs to go to the river and be successful, a tuft of yarn, and a spool of tippet. Then you are there IMO.

Great advice! and I totally agree. I would like to become Lethal with midges and small nymphs. Thanks!
__________________
Adam
awilson1010@gmail.com

My Blog: Fly Fish East Tennessee
www.flyfisheasttennessee.blogspot.com

><>
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-04-2009, 06:28 PM
monktrout's Avatar
monktrout monktrout is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 299
Default Deep midgin'

Is it just me or are we fishing midges deeper than we were ten years ago? I used to fish midges about 12-18" below the yarn. Seems like more and more anglers are routinely putting midge patterns on the bottom. Possibly the popular zebra patterns are more larva and less pupa. Are fish, rising to midges on top, sulking back down three feet? Any ideas?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:43 PM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.