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  #21  
Old 08-16-2012, 12:04 PM
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David Knapp David Knapp is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corbo View Post

These were mostly LARGE stripers that NEED cool water to survive now so their primary reason for being in that particular spot was temperature not food.
Corbo, I would respectfully disagree......partly...

Having seen monster stripers busting trout in the riffles during a pulse of generation on some of our fine tailwaters, I know that they do feed heavily on the trout. In fact, the trout are the main forage species for the stripers while they are in the tailwaters. On low water you will definitely find them in different water than most of the trout but as soon as the current quickens, they are out hunting and can eat a lot of trout. So, yes, they do move up for the cool water, but they also have to eat and those big guys eat a lot.

I do love catching stripers on the fly, but I just hate to see them in the trout waters...
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  #22  
Old 08-16-2012, 01:52 PM
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Corbo.
You have a LOT to learn about Southern stripers! They are not there because of the cooler water. They are all over in Melton Hill lake and below the Melton Hill dam and resultant Watts Bar lake. They are in the TN river system as well, including Loudon and below the dam as well. Those are not cold water fisheries. They are there for one reason only, to feed.

Schoolies in the Kennebeck are one thing. Same schoolies I caught around Portland for years. Not much to them. That is a 20# plus fish there in the photo and is not there for sculpins or cool water.
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  #23  
Old 08-16-2012, 03:03 PM
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This has been an interesting topic. I'm kind of suprised we haven't discussed this before considering I remember stripers near the jail as far back as the mid 90s. I was told that populations are so high in the clinch because a lot of fish escape from eagle bend fish hatchery....If this is true, how in the world does that happen? Same guy told me that stripers have never intentionally been stocked in Melton Hill. Yet, TWRA has established a 2 fish limit, as well as a slot for them in Melton Hill. Basically an invasive species that gets special regulations if all that is true. I guess the same can be said about the wild hogs in the mountains.

I don't know about grilling them, but if anyone can find some private property on the river to do this, i'll bring 2 large propane burners, pans, & oil.
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  #24  
Old 08-17-2012, 08:17 PM
Corbo Corbo is offline
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Flat Fly In

Not to be argumentative or anything BUT.... I beg to differ on the COLD water analysis; none of these fish was less than 30 inches and most much larger.

Were we to go to Cherokee or anywhere else to fish large stripers NOW in east TN we would find them in COLD water as these large fish cannot tolerate warm water at their given size.

The large Stripers being caught in the lakes NOW are deep in cold water and most people fail to realize that they will likely die and sink after release NOW.

Smaller stripers and hybrids can tolerate the warm water better than these monsters.

That said I would agree that on generating flows these particular fish likely go on the prowl for trout. Large stripers prefer feeding on moving water when they can get it. In the lakes here Striper fishing is a whole different game as I'm am accustomed to either fishing them in a moving river OR on a tide change; preferably the "out going" tide.

While Maine HAD zillions of Schoolies there were plenty of 28 inch plus fish to be caught; the ticket to catching them in the river was always moving water and structure.

I have seen a few You Tube videos of guys catching huge stripers on the watauga river just up from Boone. It looked like a generating flow.

What we all need to do is position ourselves in boats on the generating flow on the Clinch; observe the feeding zone and have a good time catching these beasts!

Been too busy and tired all week to tie on 4/0 hooks but perhaps tomorrow and then I need a new battery for my boat so perhaps next weekend I will catch some.
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  #25  
Old 08-17-2012, 11:18 PM
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Corbo

The dynamics in Cherokee Lake and the Clinch below Norris are not even remotely comparable. Cherokee is a typical reservoir by all measures. The Clinch below norris which ultimately forms Melton Hill lake is entirely different. One dip into Melton Hill lake right now would bring the obvious counter answer to your views. The cold water discharged from Norris Dam maintains its temperatures well down stream of Bull run steam plant. The stripers in Melton Hill lake are not moving to see cold water and thus moving up stream, they live in cold water year round, and only migrate to the steam plant for warm water in the winter, which is false as well. They are actually moving to pursue food (shad) which seek out the warm water discharge from Bull Run.

The Stripers in the Clinch and Melton Hill are not stocked, they are brood fish which were dumped in and have survived 100% on trout above Clinton, and on shad primarily below Clinton. The population is relatively small and virtually are very large fish.

You are also wrong about the release survival rates of stripers in the lakes now. If a fish is properly handled then survival rates are extremely high.


Another thing which is incorrect in your post is that fishing is best at periods of high flows or changing flows. Having spent a considerable time on the Clinch killing stripers I can say with confidence that the water being dead low is the absolute best time to target these fish. See the below image for evidence by the banks showing mud behind me. This fish was caught at the bottom end of Donnies at around 11 am with the water being off 11 hours, high sun, and on an 8" live rainbow. He is dead along with most of the fish that lived in that hole.

This isn't Maine, and our stripers do not act like ocean going stripers. I have fished for years below the dams, not as much as Flat Fly N, but a bunch. I have done extremely well on flies over the years normally during low water. I would fly fish on the Clinch, but my goal is eradication not sport. So I use the best method to kill the most.

Picture as promised, this fish had 100% trout in it's stomach and from my memory I believe it had 14 trout total that were fresh enough to distinguish species.

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  #26  
Old 08-18-2012, 12:41 PM
Corbo Corbo is offline
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I would imagine fish a live rainbow would work under any flow.
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  #27  
Old 08-18-2012, 05:54 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corbo View Post
I would imagine fish a live rainbow would work under any flow.
"......
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  #28  
Old 08-18-2012, 08:03 PM
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#1 Striper fly for years for me. Wonder what this fly looks like?

It's a six layer salad or my version of the Electric Chicken



"Only caught in current". BTW 10-15 feet max. Best day we ever had was 26 in the boat, NO CURRENT, 90 degrees outside temp on an afternoon in the summer.
5-6# schoolie




Dean with a 29#



22#


18# Do a close up on the fly. They LOVE rainbows!
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Last edited by Flat Fly n; 08-19-2012 at 11:24 AM..
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  #29  
Old 08-18-2012, 10:07 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is online now
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I was hoping you would post some pics. If anyone knows how to catch stripers on a fly in East TN it is you and that trash bird who sometimes stops in here.

You both deserve credit for doing something consistently that so many think is impossible.
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  #30  
Old 08-19-2012, 09:15 AM
Corbo Corbo is offline
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Flat fly

Like your fly
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