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Old 12-30-2013, 03:36 PM
Dawgvet Dawgvet is offline
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Default Euro-nymphing in the Smokies

Hey, I was just wondering if any of you all used any of the "Euro-nymphing" techniques in the Smokies? I have been reading George Daniel's "Dynamic Nymphing" book and would really like to try some of those techniques on our Southern Appalachian streams. I was particularly intrigued by the idea some of the long-line setups (French and Spanish techniques) for the long, clear runs in lower Little River.

I'd like to hear any feedback from folks trying these methods on our Park or surrounding waters.
Thanks
Jed
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Old 12-30-2013, 06:18 PM
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I know a guy who Czech/ french nymphs almost exclusively. I do it from time to time ad well. I know everyone says its just high sticking but there are subtle differences. The book you have is a good one.. the Czech style has allowed us to catch fish from faster water than ever before, however it does limit drift length a d how fast you can cover water...still for fast or deep holes its very effective.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:10 PM
Drifter Drifter is offline
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DV....glad you started this thread over here. I love to fish in the Park (GSMNP) and want to try Euro-nymphing there as well. I've got a lot of advice from some knowledgeable folks but there is a caveat. Most of the Euro-nymphing folks are doing it as a result of competition fishing. I have to remind myself that they are typically fishing over stocked fish. As you know....its a whole different game on those wild Little River brown trout. I'd venture a guess that the comp-style flies (fluorescent beads and such)wouldn't be as productive as other "more common" patterns.

Anyhow....looking forward to the comments here.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
DV....its a whole different game on those wild Little River brown trout. I'd venture a guess that the comp-style flies (fluorescent beads and such)wouldn't be as productive as other "more common" patterns.
And yet the pink and green weenies catch fish...

Steve
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Old 12-31-2013, 12:51 PM
Dawgvet Dawgvet is offline
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Drifter, while many of the competitions held here in the States have stocked fish, many of the European competitions are over really spooky wild fish. From what I understand, the Spanish and French nymphing techniques were developed due to the need to stay far away from their fish targets due to the low, clear water and the legendarily spooky nature of the Fario brown trout that live in the Pyrenees Mountains. This is one of the main reasons I was interested in learning these techniques, especially the long-line Spanish and French techniques as I thought it would fit Smokies fishing especially in the summers.

I welcome any other thoughts or experiences.
Thanks,
Jed
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Old 12-31-2013, 02:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
Most of the Euro-nymphing folks are doing it as a result of competition fishing. I have to remind myself that they are typically fishing over stocked fish. As you know....its a whole different game on those wild Little River brown trout.
The folks who fish this stye do so because it is the most efficient way possible to work a run and catch just about any feeding fish it holds. When it comes to a competition, that is the name of the game. Work your beat as thoroughly as possible in the time allotted.

Competition fishing can be and often is outright difficult, regardless of whether or not the fish are stocked or wild. It might be better if one were to look at it like this... perhaps you need to remind yourself that they are pros for a reason. I know some GA comp guys that can absolutely destroy a wild stream like you wouldn't believe. You stick one of them on LR and I guarantee you would be shocked at the brownies they would dredge up given enough opportunity...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgvet View Post
Drifter, while many of the competitions held here in the States have stocked fish, many of the European competitions are over really spooky wild fish.
DV is right...
However, there are plenty of really spooky wild fish here in US comps as well. Also, stocked competition fish are sometimes reared in a more natural, wild environment unlike what you would find at your average hatchery.


Tight Lines,
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Old 12-31-2013, 06:07 PM
The Gubna The Gubna is offline
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I watched a few comp guys fish a technical small wild trout stream in north Georgia, and they were not only catching a lot of fish, they were catching large fish. I would much rather chuck articulated streamers or delicate dry flies to rising fish. That being said, euro nymphing is more often than not going to be the most productive method of fishing on a day in and day out basis.
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:22 PM
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From my own experience wild fish are easier to catch than stockers...now that is a general statement about general size fish and normal conditions. But all in all wild fish are less picky, and feed when they are usually supposed to. They like very predictable types of water depending on the time of year and conditions..

Stockers on the other hand will at times not feed all day long. And when they do its often some crazy pattern that fools the fish. Also stockers live in odd places...slow water in summertime, or tail outs during low water...the up side to stockers is how close you can often get to them..


I personally don't think competition anglers are any better than a handful of guys we have fishing locally . I don't know about Europe. But our competitions here are held on very heavily, very recently, stocked rivers...
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:27 PM
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PS. What's a technical wild stream in the south. Freestone mountain streams with wild fish are not technical..
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