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  #11  
Old 02-27-2008, 10:37 PM
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Gerry Romer Gerry Romer is offline
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Default BHPT video

Found this video at the Fly Fisherman Magazine website. Very close-up detail shots of yet another way to tie a BHPT (bead on this one is optional, of course). You'll especially like the way he ties in the Peacock herl.


http://link.brightcove.com/services/...ctid1348305516

Gerry
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Old 02-29-2008, 12:43 PM
limbsnagger limbsnagger is offline
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Thanks fellas for pics and video. Those bring up a couple of questions. Do you guys prefer non bead head flies or do you love 'em? Also, noticed that the gentelmen in the video clips his legs for length as oppossed to trying to measure out just the right amt. Do you think those clipped legs give different action in water & does it matter? I'm sure profile and proportion are the keys to fly tying just like fly fishing. I guess this is all fairly speculative stuff but I've learned alot by asking questions like this from fellas that've been fly fishing alot longer then me and some of it, not all, but alot has realy helped me to catch more fish so fly tying I'm thinking should be the same.

Again, thanks to both you fellas for taking the effort to make those post. Hope there's some way I can return the favor some day!

Chad
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  #13  
Old 02-29-2008, 03:16 PM
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You're right about profile and proportion being more important factors, but don't forget size. I sometimes think size is more important than even color. As for cut-to-measure vs measured-to-fit, I don't think it really matters much because at that length the fibers are relatively stiff anyway and you're not going to get as much movement out of them as you would CDC fibers or small rubber legs at that length. IMHO

Gerry
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:58 PM
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I agree with Gerry, I doubt that cutting the legs makes much difference. The original Pheasant Tail tied by Frank Sawyer didn't even have any legs. It also didn't have a peacock thorax like the American version tied by Al Troth that most of us use today. Sawyer tied the fly to imitate swimming mayfly nymphs, and he reasoned that since they swim with their legs tucked along side and beneath their bodies, the imitation didn't need any legs. There were only 2 materials used to tie the fly. He didn't even use thread, the copper wire was use to tie in and tie off the pt fibers.

http://www.danica.com/flytier/hweilenmann/sawyer_pt.htm

Look at this old film of Sawyer tying the PT. I think this was shot it the 50's and it looks like it was shot on Super 8 or something. Look at his hands as he ties the fly. You can tell the man was no stranger to hard work.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=416Os9V84n8

I have to admit though on a personal level, I cringe when I see someone cutting hackle, hair, or anything else to size it correctly verses using proper proportions.
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Last edited by flyman; 02-29-2008 at 10:07 PM.. Reason: Genetics have been cruel to me
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