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Old 03-12-2009, 10:38 AM
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ttas67 ttas67 is offline
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Default Holston Caddis Larvae

Has anyone had success on the Holston with caddis larva? I have been experimenting with various larva patterns, attempting to imitate the fat free living caddis in the river with no success. Have also been tying and fishing imitations in the czech nymph style to no avail. I'm starting to wonder how often they feed on the larva stage. These larva are generally buried in some moss under a rock .... maybe they're not readily available to the trout?

If anyone has had success with larva patterns on the Holston, I'd be interested to know.
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Old 03-12-2009, 11:05 AM
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Default Caddis Larva

Trevor,
There are a couple of patterns that have been very successful through the years on the Holston River. In the early part of the season the Net Builder Caddis Larva has been very good and as the season progresses the Green Caddis Larva , used as a dropper underneath a CDC and Elk or just a plain Elk Hair Caddis have performed very well. You need to be very aware of how the fish are feeding to be successful using the larva stage. There are just some years that they don't key on larva or emergers and other years that they do. Watch the form of the rise to see if it is a dimple or a splashy rise. If you see sides flashing on the bottom, that is an indication that they are nymphing and the Czech Nymph or the Net Builder Caddis Larva is what you want on there. That BHPTN works awfully well too. I'm not going to link the flies, but you can click on Tailwater Trout Flies and see both those patterns. Good luck.
Hugh
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Old 03-12-2009, 12:46 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is online now
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They eat them like popcorn, but why worry with something when anything which is close will work? The Holston fish are far from difficult to catch, tie on some sort of dark nymph and go with it, don't make things more complicated then they are on the surface. Despite what Hugh says, they always eat them, there isn't much else too eat in that river. There are no mayflies to speak of, and caddis make up 90% of their diet.

One battle which is tough is when they get keyed in on caddis emergers, rather then get bogged down with that fight, take 30 mins on the bank and let them switch to adults.

I just cannot for the life of me figure out why you would want to take something painfully simple and make it into a quantitative analysis problem.
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Old 03-12-2009, 01:30 PM
CinciVol CinciVol is offline
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"I just cannot for the life of me figure out why you would want to take something painfully simple and make it into a quantitative analysis problem."

I think that you have a pretty good definition of fly fishing there. If we all just wanted to keep things as simple as possible, we'd all be fishin' with corn. I don't see a problem with the "simplest" baitfishing technique or the most complex entomological quantitative analysis as long as everyone follows the rules and is friendly. All hobbies are pretty absurd when you think about it.

That said, I always love swinging a wet fly when it looks like trout are hitting caddis emergers. Talk about a simple way to present a fly and the fish pretty much hook themselves.
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Old 03-12-2009, 01:45 PM
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Fishermansfly Fishermansfly is offline
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Brother it's probably the way your fishing it. Look up the Big Horn Method! From what I hear you saying and seeing as I haven't yet to wet a line in that river it's appears as if it's the method in which your attempting to fish that fly! I'd love to draw out the entire rig for you from running line to your last fly. It looks pretty crazy but seems to work for those fish feeding in the vegitation.

The big horn river is chalked full of grass, so much so that you don't even see a vast majority of those 18''+ fish that fill that river. The big horn river is one of the most densly populated rivers in the conjoined states and if your not fishing it right you will have a rough day. We had two of those days and then figured out this method! The best advise I know to give is don't give up and take your indicator all the way up until it almost reaches your running line on a 9' leader. Big upstream mends, drift, drift, set, set, set!

~Brett
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Old 03-12-2009, 05:31 PM
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Waterborn Waterborn is offline
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Untill caddis come off, a small midge will do the trick - was there tuesday and had it dropped off a pt and hands down took all the fish...come caddis time, 2nd the small softhackle swung and twitched will crack you up on how simple it works when caddis emerging and too much fun at that...then switch to dries when the surface gets boiling - theres a small 18 green bodied caddis (mothers day variety?) and later on a larger 14 tan, either way they'll eat with reckless abandon...there's also a crazy cranefly hatch, but never bothered to immitate because the caddis is so dominate...
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Old 03-12-2009, 07:09 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishermansfly View Post
Brother it's probably the way your fishing it. Look up the Big Horn Method! From what I hear you saying and seeing as I haven't yet to wet a line in that river it's appears as if it's the method in which your attempting to fish that fly! I'd love to draw out the entire rig for you from running line to your last fly. It looks pretty crazy but seems to work for those fish feeding in the vegitation.

The big horn river is chalked full of grass, so much so that you don't even see a vast majority of those 18''+ fish that fill that river. The big horn river is one of the most densly populated rivers in the conjoined states and if your not fishing it right you will have a rough day. We had two of those days and then figured out this method! The best advise I know to give is don't give up and take your indicator all the way up until it almost reaches your running line on a 9' leader. Big upstream mends, drift, drift, set, set, set!

~Brett
It would be dang near impossible to fish "bighorn style" on the Holston. There is no grass, so no worries there, and most of the water is waste deep. If you put an indicator as deep as you would there, you will spend all day hung up.

The Holston is one of the few rivers in this area where a perfect dead drift if not mandatory, because of the caddis. If it is perfect, if not, not a huge deal.

Like I said, there might not be a dumber group of trout in this state then the Holston fish, sure they have their moments of being horrible, but overall they eat almost anything that is put in front of them.
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