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Old 09-01-2009, 08:49 AM
Rebelsoul Rebelsoul is offline
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Default Fishing after hard rains?

Okay,I'm new at mountain creek fishing,but have been fishing creeks in my area of Middle Tn. for over 50 years....which means I'm still uneducated about mountain streams.
After heavy rains is the fishing really slow because of food washing down to the trout?
If so,how long does it take for it to get better?
I know after reading alot that the flow is better than previous years,so do the streams fish better now with more water,or when the water level was lower with fewer places for fish to hold?
Really what I need is a basic primer on conditions of streams relating to weather and such.I see the fishing reports,but don't understand the creeks themselves that well.Does that make sense?
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Old 09-01-2009, 10:17 AM
fearnofishbob fearnofishbob is offline
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Rebelsoul, It's difficult to give you a "black & white" answer because there are so many variables. Your conclusion that more food being available is correct to some extent but there are numerous other factors. How much heavy rain did the stream get ? temperature ?, barametric pressure changes ?, were normal hatches affected by the heavy rain ?, was there a full moon the night before ?.
Some people mistakenly assume that trout feed all day long....ain't so !
I have always felt that fishing during & after a rain was good as long as the water did not get too mirky or too high, the time to fold up your rod and go sit by the camp fire is learned by spending time on the creeks.I know this is probably not the answer you were looking for but "this is my story and I'm stickin' to it"
We wish you the very best fishing here in the mountains..........Bob

Last edited by fearnofishbob; 09-01-2009 at 10:21 AM.. Reason: delete
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Old 09-01-2009, 10:21 AM
fearnofishbob fearnofishbob is offline
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Talking Fishin' vs. Rain

Rebelsoul, It's difficult to give you a "black & white" answer because there are so many variables. Your conclusion that more food being available is correct to some extent but there are numerous other factors. How much heavy rain did the stream get ? temperature ?, barametric pressure changes ?, were normal hatches affected by the heavy rain ?, was there a full moon the night before ?.
Some people mistakenly assume that trout feed all day long....ain't so !
I have always felt that fishing during & after a rain was good as long as the water did not get too mirky or too high, the time to fold up your rod and go sit by the camp fire is learned by spending time on the creeks.I know this is probably not the answer you were looking for but "this is my story and I'm stickin' to it"
We wish you the very best fishing here in the mountains..........Bob
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Old 09-01-2009, 12:23 PM
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Carolina Boy Carolina Boy is offline
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Caught one of my biggest browns when the water looked like rolling cup of choclate milk! I will say that I think that it breaks down like this, when the water gets high and muddy fish will eat, but you gotta put it on ther nose cause they can't see it, and you can't see them, so you blind fish to likely holding spots..ie cuts in the current and on the bank line. It would seem the fish feed only on what hits em in the face, therefore they aren't feeding as often. Consequently when that water starts to drop and getts clearer, like tea colored'ish the fish seem to have a cross between a NEED to feed as they shut down a good deal for the last (however long the water was up and dark) fews days, that need incorporated with some since of safety due the still stained water can be great fishing. They don't have a choice. Additionally, as fearnofishbob (great name by the way)said during the fall and early spring when we have heavy rain it usually is do to a strong low pressure systems that has move through, which puts animals down all over. You know how we ache and know when it is gonna rain cuz our injuries from the past hurt, well that is the pressure change animals feel it too. Fish run deep to get away from this. now think about a park stream not too deep so they can only dive so deep and usually stay put till the water corrects itself. high and or stained water can produce some big browns but be carefull when you wade, and where you step in a only a few inchs of inches could hold a monster brown!
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Old 09-01-2009, 01:22 PM
Carlito Carlito is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Boy View Post
Additionally, as fearnofishbob (great name by the way)said during the fall and early spring when we have heavy rain it usually is do to a strong low pressure systems that has move through, which puts animals down all over. You know how we ache and know when it is gonna rain cuz our injuries from the past hurt, well that is the pressure change animals feel it too. Fish run deep to get away from this. now think about a park stream not too deep so they can only dive so deep and usually stay put till the water corrects itself.
For what it's worth, I have heard that fish can sense the decreased barometric pressure and instinctively move to deeper water where the pressure is higher as a defensive instinct.

I saw a really interesting documentary where scientists GPS tagged a population of sharks in a bay area and observed how they all moved out to deeper water as a strong low pressure storm system moved in.

And in general terms, I have often enjoyed good fishing after a good rain when the water is a bit higher than normal but not raging and not too colored.
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Old 09-01-2009, 01:45 PM
Rebelsoul Rebelsoul is offline
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Thanks for the replies,you've helped...hope more chime in.
I haven't thought this much about fishing in many moons,since I know the nature of things in my own area,I grew up with it and had a grandpa who knew much about the outdoors and taught me firsthand,which I'll be forever grateful.
I'm learning so much that it is a great experience for an ol' dawg like me.
That,with the yearning to just be in the mountains and enjoy nature makes it something to become addicted to.
Ya'll who live there,should truly be thankful.
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Old 09-01-2009, 02:16 PM
Carlito Carlito is offline
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Originally Posted by Rebelsoul View Post
Ya'll who live there,should truly be thankful.
I give thanks every time I set foot in the Park. It is a big reason why I continue to call East Tennessee home.
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Old 09-01-2009, 04:56 PM
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Carolina Boy Carolina Boy is offline
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Thats what i am talking about Carlito, I used to teach a college course on hurricanes, they are low pressure syytems. I would explain the energy that is transfered into way action by taking a rectangular basin with water in it. then i would smack the water with my hand, obviously wave action would be created and move towards the other end, thus energy moving through the water, that is energy moving down and through the water, well same in the river however instead of a spinning ball of energy it is in the form of a somewhat north to south line where two air masses of differing presssure are converging. The line is were the rain will typically develop often with a cold front behind it pushing east and or south. this is more typical in the fall and winter due to the jet stream.
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