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  #11  
Old 12-01-2010, 08:58 PM
Heavynets Heavynets is offline
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I own a Mokai. It's basically a motorized kayak. It uses an inboard 7 HP Subaru Robins 4 cycle engine to turn a turbine pump (jet). I stand up in it to fish all the time, but it is best at just getting you to a spot to wade. It will go upstream on the Cumberland at 3000 cfs with no problems. The website is Mokai.com.

Here is review I wrote about it for another site:
Now that I have about 20 hours on my Mokai I would like to give a brief review.

First the bad:

I received the boat about four weeks after my initial 4 week deliver date. Thatís a 100% error in their ability to estimate a delivery date. Unbelievable!

Iím a lightweight and can only get the boat up to 14.5 mph. I was expecting 18-19 mph. For me this is not an issue, but again they over promised and under delivered.

The noise issue is still there. I never heard the Honda, so I donít know how bad it is, but I need ear plugs if Iím going to run the Subaru over 5 mph. Why they didnít even bother to point the exhaust to the rear, I donít know. Instead the exhaust points straight up and ends flush with the engine cover.

The boat is direct drive, so it starts moving as soon as the engine starts. Mine idles at about 3-4 mph. Many times I want to go much slower. I think it needs a centrifugal clutch. This would eliminate a lot of stops and starts of the engine and give much better control of the speed.

To stop the engine you have to pull a plastic clip from under the kill switch. To restart the clip must first be manually replaced. The clip can be attached to the operator so if he fall overboard the engine stops. What is needed is the addition of a thumb actuated kill switch located at the end of the steering/accelerator bar. This would eliminate a lot of fiddling with the plastic clip.

The cockpit is a little small if you want to carry tackle box, lunch, extra clothes, etc. Not much room to move around with extra gear.

High speed maneuverability is very poor. Itís impossible to make sharp turns at full or even moderate throttle. If you are expecting jet ski performance....donít.

The boat is a little heavier than I expected. One hundred pounds is heavier than it use to be. No way I could ever put it on a car top carrier. I haul it in the back of my Ford Ranger pickup. Lifting one end at a time to only waist high is no problem.

Now the good:

That Subaru engine ALWAYS starts on the second pull when cold and on the first pull when hot. It doesnít take much pull force either. I am really impressed with that motor.

The motor and gas tank can be removed or installed in 2-3 minutes. Itís well engineered.

The engine is VERY economical on gas. I have been out for 5-6 hours and have never even use 1/2 of a tank. Iím sure this will vary with speed, but still, Iím impressed.

The boat is very stable. I frequently stand up while fly fishing with no undue concern. Trying to move around or turn around while standing is another matter.

With only a few exceptions the boat is well thought out and built with quality craftsmanship.

The boatís hull is very rugged. Iím sure it can take a beating.

To me the Mokai is the perfect river/stream boat for the guy who travels alone, getting to remote locations. It is OK to fish out of, but is best at exploring or getting you to that remote fishing or hunting location. Of course it works on lakes too, but that is a waste of the jet propulsion unless the lake has a lot of prop busting rocks.

Just my opinion.
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  #12  
Old 12-01-2010, 10:54 PM
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MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heavynets View Post
I own a Mokai.
I think I heard one of those on the Clinch once...
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  #13  
Old 12-03-2010, 11:41 AM
SuperFly SuperFly is offline
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Thanks for the great responses. I have a lot to look into before I drop some money in the new year, but at least now I know what I am looking for.

As for a outboard motor, is there a website that people post motors for sale or is it better to check craigslist?

I looked for Johnson "short shank" but came back with the first result being this forum thread. I tried short shaft and got more hits. I am assuming that the terms mean the same thing, if not let me know.

I also have a question about storage. I know that most people who have ski boats and such "winterize" their boats since they don't go in the water during fall and winter. Since we don't winterize them because we use them all year round are there any things that I need to consider from a maintenance point-of-view.

Also, I don't have a garage, but might have access to one if necessary. What is the next best way to store my boat between uses if I don't have a garage to place it in?

Thanks for the help. I truly appreciate every opinion.
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  #14  
Old 12-03-2010, 05:54 PM
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MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperFly View Post
Thanks for the great responses. I have a lot to look into before I drop some money in the new year, but at least now I know what I am looking for.

As for a outboard motor, is there a website that people post motors for sale or is it better to check craigslist?

I looked for Johnson "short shank" but came back with the first result being this forum thread. I tried short shaft and got more hits. I am assuming that the terms mean the same thing, if not let me know.

I also have a question about storage. I know that most people who have ski boats and such "winterize" their boats since they don't go in the water during fall and winter. Since we don't winterize them because we use them all year round are there any things that I need to consider from a maintenance point-of-view.

Also, I don't have a garage, but might have access to one if necessary. What is the next best way to store my boat between uses if I don't have a garage to place it in?

Thanks for the help. I truly appreciate every opinion.
Short shank in short shaft are the same thing....I believe my explanation is the generic of the two...

Winterizing is a huge deal when it comes to boats. Basically it comes down to freezing and cracking things due to expansion. Outboard motors are subject to any water freezing in the water jacket (a diagram of water passages around the upward motor block that cools the engine in operation). Some people will dry run their motor for a few seconds upon trailering. I don't like that approach due to the water-pump getting damaged. Not a big deal, but I would not do it with a new motor. Most of the time you will be ok if you store the motor upright and there are no blockages in the cooling system.

Another issue is the lower unit (foot) of the motor cracking due to water intrusion. I see this more than anything. A new foot costs more than a replacement motor in most cases. Basically; just make sure you have good seals and heavy weight foot oil in the lower unit.

I think it is good to fog the engine cylinders if the motor sits for several months to prevent rust and other issues.

Also, make sure you drain your carburetor of gas in the valves and in the bowl if you are storing it. This causes ah about 90% of engine trouble. Some people run Stabil in the fuel lines; but, this will only give you a month or two more protection from fuel destabilization. Try to stay away from Ethanol gas for your outboard motors. If you have a left over fuel at the end of the season; consider it junk gas and recycle it appropriately. I try not to purchase too much gas at any one time when using an outboard motor. They use very little and you will rarely run low on a trip in our area.

Add some environmental RV Antifreeze to the bilge and suction enough to flush the system of inert water. Bilge pumps crack like a boiled egg right at 32 degrees. Same process for fish holds, etc....

Always store the motor upright. Keep your battery inside a garage or building. Store it full and recharge about once a month. Several ways to do this...

Trolling motors are bad to freeze and break the seals. What happens is that there is always a small amount that gets in to the motor compartment. If the motor is hung on the wall in the shed with the propeller up; it will not drain out and it will freeze and make the broken seals worse. Plus, any water that is left in there will slowly rust away the motor. Always store them with the propeller pitched downward.

That is about all I can think of...
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  #15  
Old 12-11-2010, 12:50 AM
gutshot gutshot is offline
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You already have the best boat for the Caney fork river, but if you want a boat that can fish several people then I agree that the Arkansas style boats are the best for the application, imo. Get a short one however since the Caney has some very narrow places and making long casts to cover the river are not required as would be when fishing middle or lower sections of a river like the little red.

The best fishing approach on the Caney is drifting in your Kayak with the fly below you about 30 feet or getting out and wading. Additionally, you will scare a lot fewer big fish by paddling over them than by running an outboard past them. Can you catch them after doing both yep, but my percentages are better in the kayak.
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  #16  
Old 12-11-2010, 02:36 PM
SuperFly SuperFly is offline
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Ok. I have run into another question about boat registration. I was talking to someone about a boat that they had sitting in their back yard, and I offered to buy it. The hull was in good condition. No rust. Anyway, the sale fell through because the person told me that they didn't have the bill of sale, and I wouldn't be able to get it registered.

Is that true? I didn't know enough to dispute that, and I got the impression that the person didn't want to sell the boat even though they had rested the trailer on a tree stump so long that the stump grew around the trailer.

If what they say is true then I will just move on to another boat.

Thanks for the help.
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  #17  
Old 12-13-2010, 10:19 AM
Bfish Bfish is offline
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You need to show sale tax was paid. Bill of sale can be written on a napkin/scrape piece of paper. Google "bill of sale" and you can get some samples.

OR you can tell the county clerk that you traded down for the boat.

http://www.tn.gov/twra/boatregistrations.html
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  #18  
Old 12-14-2010, 09:42 AM
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MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
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Try to find out the Make/Model if you can...? Also, there should be some serial numbers stamped on the transom or inside. You may have to scratch away at some paint. If you buy an unidentifiable boat; make it identifiable by putting your mark or your serial numbers on it.

*Be sure and carry insurance on your boat. You can get it with your automobile carrier at a discount and it usually costs around $30-50/year based on the value you are insuring. The personal liability is part of this coverage and it helps you relax a bit when carrying passengers.
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Last edited by MadisonBoats; 12-14-2010 at 09:51 AM.. Reason: P.S.
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  #19  
Old 12-14-2010, 12:52 PM
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You should try craigs list and search the short shaft motors for your area. I bought a used rig a few years back and have really enjoyed it for my local river. It's a Carolina Skiff J14 with an Evinrude 18 Jet, which is the 25hp head on a Jet platform. I've dinged the glass finish on the boat a few times and came home and patched it with a glass kit (stinky stuff, I tell you) but nothing major. As far as that jet it just depends on if you have the luxury of motoring up to fish or not. I have several spots where the fishing is better downriver and there are few limits on the jet, it'll run in a ditch if it's raining good. I did find the whole setup used (in great shape) and give the guy 2200 for boat, jet outboard, and Long trailer. I thought it was a good deal, the motors worth that by itself. Keep looking, you'll find what you're after.
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  #20  
Old 12-19-2010, 09:00 PM
SuperFly SuperFly is offline
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I have been looking online for a boat, and have actually looked at a couple in person. Something I am running into is that a lot of them are not very wide. I remember troutman in this thread saying that I should look for a jon boat that is at least 42" but should get closer to 48".

Does the same go for semi v-hull boats like that starcraft that Troutman fixed up? What is a good width for one of those? I am seeing a lot of semi v-hulls online and am thinking that might be a way to go.

Are there any huge differences between a jon boat and a v-hull? It seems like a jon boat may have more room in the front, and it has a flatter bottom.

Thanks for all the advice. This is really helpful. I hope to be starting the new year on a boat restoration project of my own.
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