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  #11  
Old 11-01-2011, 08:23 PM
oldschool oldschool is offline
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From experience I can tell you don't go over it stern first, aka. backwards just for the sake of being funny. Having done that: Yes, I thought it was funny.... but: There was a ton of water in the boat after the first wave that the stern spears into and continues underwater. All tackle and contents of the boat will be floating in about 8-10 inches of high quality cold Clinch River H2O. This makes a drift boat handle very poorly: unresponsive to the oars since it isn't floating too good any more and very unstable. You better have some large arms to keep things upright and have two other fools in the boat bailing water and trying to clean up the mess you just caused.

Moral of the story is be very careful or don't do it at all, no trout is worth losing all your stuff or worse getting hurt/killed.
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  #12  
Old 11-01-2011, 09:58 PM
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Steve Wright Steve Wright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
From experience I can tell you don't go over it stern first, aka. backwards just for the sake of being funny. Having done that: Yes, I thought it was funny.... but: There was a ton of water in the boat after the first wave that the stern spears into and continues underwater. All tackle and contents of the boat will be floating in about 8-10 inches of high quality cold Clinch River H2O. This makes a drift boat handle very poorly: unresponsive to the oars since it isn't floating too good any more and very unstable. You better have some large arms to keep things upright and have two other fools in the boat bailing water and trying to clean up the mess you just caused.

Moral of the story is be very careful or don't do it at all, no trout is worth losing all your stuff or worse getting hurt/killed.
Thought you were in a cave...................take bloody mary recipe to Rocky
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  #13  
Old 11-01-2011, 11:07 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
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Originally Posted by Trico View Post
I have been over the weir a couple of times in a drift boat with someone else doing the rowing. I asked about this short time ago with waterwolf being the only one to reply that he had done it. I am an inexperienced drift boat operator but that does not stop me from having an opinion. Being the passenger it seemed rather simple. I think as long as you go over straight or just at a very slight angle you are fine. The times I have been over were rather smooth and quick. I think the big danger is going over side ways. With the "steps" this weir seems to be more like going down a "slide" then over a dam. Perhaps waterwolf could add to this. There is the question of whether it is legal or not.

It seems simple enough to keep a drift boat straight, and it is, however it has always amazed me how hard it is for some rowers to do this. That said, it is also tricky doing it in heavy current, and drops like the weir. The force of the water where it shallows up to make the drop is incredible, and can easily pivot a boat and if a person isn't really experienced can cause major issues.
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  #14  
Old 11-02-2011, 09:01 AM
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MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
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I really would not endorse anyone doing it and I think it does not represent our sport in good conduct.

However; the Mackenzie Drift Boat-style is designed to address much more complicated environments than most tailwaters. That is one of the primary reasons I have designed my own boat. I wanted a boat that is more practical for the tailwaters. Also; I want it to do what I want to do when I want to do it...I want to maximize the fishing experience and minimize the effort/detraction.

Plus, these boats are pretty darn simple to design and build. It is the legal process that keeps most people out of the boat building market.

Hopefully, I can get my product out to people who have expressed interest. In the initial phase; I may have to build a few kit boats or hobby boats to use for R&D.

Sorry Rod...I did not mean to hijack your thread.
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  #15  
Old 11-02-2011, 05:33 PM
pineman19 pineman19 is offline
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Originally Posted by MadisonBoats View Post
I really would not endorse anyone doing it and I think it does not represent our sport in good conduct.

However; the Mackenzie Drift Boat-style is designed to address much more complicated environments than most tailwaters. That is one of the primary reasons I have designed my own boat. I wanted a boat that is more practical for the tailwaters. Also; I want it to do what I want to do when I want to do it...I want to maximize the fishing experience and minimize the effort/detraction.

Plus, these boats are pretty darn simple to design and build. It is the legal process that keeps most people out of the boat building market.

Hopefully, I can get my product out to people who have expressed interest. In the initial phase; I may have to build a few kit boats or hobby boats to use for R&D.

Sorry Rod...I did not mean to hijack your thread.
Shawn,

I admire your ethical approach to boating and fishing on tailwaters. I also think it's cool that you are desgning a different boat for fishing these rivers. I wish you the best of success in this venture. Maybe one day, I'll be able to afford a boat

Neal
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  #16  
Old 11-02-2011, 10:55 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadisonBoats View Post
I really would not endorse anyone doing it and I think it does not represent our sport in good conduct.

However; the Mackenzie Drift Boat-style is designed to address much more complicated environments than most tailwaters. That is one of the primary reasons I have designed my own boat. I wanted a boat that is more practical for the tailwaters. Also; I want it to do what I want to do when I want to do it...I want to maximize the fishing experience and minimize the effort/detraction.

Plus, these boats are pretty darn simple to design and build. It is the legal process that keeps most people out of the boat building market.

Hopefully, I can get my product out to people who have expressed interest. In the initial phase; I may have to build a few kit boats or hobby boats to use for R&D.

Sorry Rod...I did not mean to hijack your thread.

I think it is because most folks are too lazy or don't want to invest the free time in building their own boat.

I would if I had the ability, time, and know how. However, my craftsmanship would lead to swimming fisherman, lost gear, and new structure on the stream bed.
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  #17  
Old 11-03-2011, 08:33 AM
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MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pineman19 View Post
Shawn,

I admire your ethical approach to boating and fishing on tailwaters. I also think it's cool that you are desgning a different boat for fishing these rivers. I wish you the best of success in this venture. Maybe one day, I'll be able to afford a boat


Neal

Thanks Neal for the compliment. I used to be a little more reckless in life and it took several life changing events to wake me up to what really matters in life. Living a good and honorable life is something no one can take away from you and no amount of money and power can buy!

For a boat; you should start with an old aluminum semi-v boat and a trolling motor. This will give you many opportunities to be on the river, affordable, and safe method.
I will help you prepare it for the river as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waterwolf View Post
I think it is because most folks are too lazy or don't want to invest the free time in building their own boat.

I would if I had the ability, time, and know how. However, my craftsmanship would lead to swimming fisherman, lost gear, and new structure on the stream bed.
I agree...that is probably another good reason. However; I have found that most people are pretty resourceful when they have the desire and dedication. I enjoy the beauty of the custom plank boats and hand-plane built boats. My problem is staying focused and not working too much on side projects.
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Last edited by MadisonBoats; 11-04-2011 at 09:28 AM.. Reason: clarity
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  #18  
Old 11-03-2011, 11:13 AM
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"over the weir in a boat".....aka....can you play Russian roulette and get away with it?...Why? For a fish?
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