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  #21  
Old 11-28-2011, 12:31 PM
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Bran Bran is offline
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Again Mr. Casada, very interesting conversation. As to the family, I'm sure they would be somewhat in denial of the truth as I know I would also be in that situation. They're not the sort of things you're proud of great grandpa for doing, you know, and they have a reputation to uphold, but, as you said, it's the truth.
It's a tragic tale except for the part about helping to nurture the idea of making the Smokies something for all generations to enjoy, and for that, we can all be thankful for everyone that played a part.
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  #22  
Old 11-28-2011, 03:37 PM
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Default Great thread, interesting info!

I am not sure if anyone posted a link to the "Tuck Reader" artcile, but it is a good read and very informative. It's just my opinion, but personaly I consider the thoughts shared by locals such as Mr. Casada and many others to carry alot more weight as coming from those who themselves or whose families lived alongside Mr. Kephart. Family members being human are prone to want to hide or forget even the facts when such facts paint a less or other than flattering picture of a family member.

The more I have read of the region over the years, the more obvious it has become to me that people are just people. I believe it was in Mr. Dunn's book that certain things were shared that were less than flattering about certain regions in or around Cades Cove, yet the words used to describe a less than positive region were specific enough that you could clearly see those mentioned were an isolated group. In other words, simply put you could see that among the good folks there were some that were less than savory and that those who were less than savory were an/the exception. I suspect that some find it difficult to acknowledge others, such as Kep, were less than perfect, perhaps that is because we would then find ourselves confronted with our own imperfections. Truth be told, none of us are perfect, some of us don't even come close...me personaly I am trusting a Savior who is and rejoicing every day.

Link to the article mentioned

http://www.tuckreader.com/kephart-th...rn-highlander/
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  #23  
Old 11-28-2011, 09:25 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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pmike--Yes, that's the link. I checked and was pleased it's still in the Tuck Reader archives. The article is a somewhat shortened version of the presentation I made at the UT Library. It was accompanied by lots of slides, mostly taken by my brother, Don, who ran the power point as I talked. Some were really telling, such as photos of mountain cemeteries which gave the lie to Kephart's statement about unmarked and untended graves, along with some vintage stuff showing homes of the supposedly no-good "branch-water" people and especially lovely flowers around old home places. They still bloom almost 80 years after creation of the Park and close to a century since Kephart first wrote his book.
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  #24  
Old 11-29-2011, 12:21 PM
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Just thought I would add that the "Reader" has several articles written by Mr. Casada and I have sure found each I've read to be both interesting and informative. I can't begin to express my gratitude to Mr. Casada and other locals for the insights and information posted about the region and it's history. From way back in the early 60's and my first vacation to the Smokies I have loved them...kind of a love at first sight Over the years my interest in and appreciation for the region has only increased. I have always dreamed of living in or at least much closer to the mountains, but thus far it has eluded me other than a month or so that I lived in the Tennessee foothills. Being able to read the history and about the experiences of others has been more of a blessing to me than words can describe!!!

Thanks to each of you and God Bless,
Mike
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  #25  
Old 11-29-2011, 07:23 PM
Dawgvet Dawgvet is offline
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Mr. Casada, I really enjoy your insight on the Park and interaction with the people of the surrounding (and overtaken) communities. I have some good friends whose family lived on Hazel Creek before the lake was built and still return for the annual reunion. As much as I treasure the Park for all its current attributes, I think we all gain more appreciation for the sacrifices made by so many for it to exist. Please continue to interact with this forum as I thoroughly enjoyed your book, Tuck Reader articles, any contributions here.
Regards,
Jedidiah Green
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  #26  
Old 12-05-2011, 10:21 PM
FishNHunt FishNHunt is offline
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Mr. Jim

I hunt a lot and cover many mountain miles in a day but, a 40 mile trek is unbelievable. I can hardly drag myself to bed after I cover 8-10 miles chasing dogs up and over these mountains. Those were MEN back in those days.

Good to read some history from you again Jim.
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  #27  
Old 12-05-2011, 10:50 PM
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LA MantaRay12 LA MantaRay12 is offline
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Mr. Casada.

I would love to hear more about Mark Cathey and the area around Indian Creek. Mr Cathey sounds like a very interesting gentleman. I would also love to hear more about the area of Cataloochee...as many years as I have been going to the Smokies I have never been to Cataloochee and started reading about the area in your book...very intriguing. I can't wait to go back and see the area. Would also like to hear more about the adventures of Jim Casada and Bill Rolen...couple of fish catchin' mountain fellas.

Your book was very interesting and I really enjoyed the way you intertwined the history of the Smokies with the fishing information. What's next on the horizon?
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  #28  
Old 12-06-2011, 10:22 AM
Knothead Knothead is offline
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I have read this thread and post with much interest. So much history there in the mountains. I was born and raised in Ohio. "Shank's mare" was a common reference to walking. My father used to say, also, "Walking ain't crowded." Another expression is going by "ankle express."
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  #29  
Old 12-06-2011, 04:54 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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John and Charles--I've written a lot on Mark Cathey and you can find some of that on line in the archives of the Tuck Reader. As for shank's mare and a general love of history in the region, let me recommend a daily blog operated by a dear friend of mine who is a treasure and who loves all things connected with mountain culture--it is Tipper Pressley's Blind Pig and the Acorn. Just google it and then, for information on "shank's mare," look at her blog from two or three days back. It came out of a guest blog provided by my brother, Don, in which he used the term. I do the occasional guest blog as well, although my contributions are always on mountain culture rather than on fishing.
Jim Casada
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  #30  
Old 12-06-2011, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bran View Post
Mr. Casada,
I also formed that opinion of Kephart after reading more about his background on the U.T. website and some other documents. I only regret that I had already bought several of his books when I learned some of his background, otherwise, I wouldn't have probably even bought them. I know he had strong points but it seems the most important things in life he could have ever left as a legacy, his family and children, he completely failed at, and didn't seem to have a bit of remorse for it either. I cannot respect someone with those credentials, no matter what else he may have lent to the Nat'l Park effort, or to the hobby of camping and woodcraft. He seems to have been a really strange character.
Bran, I would urge you to have no regrets over buying Kephart's books. If you wait to find a writer who had no emotional or lifestyle issues, you will miss out on some very good stuff. It seems like they all have some strange disposition and lots of serious flaws, but if they written works are well done than I would just take the enjoyment from that.
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