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Old 10-28-2008, 02:53 PM
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Default Fly selection/hints/tips for the Caney?

I had a few questions regarding flies and techniques for the Caney. Lately it seems as if the fishing has died down a bit, and I want more action! Haha.

For wooly buggers/streamers, are beadheads necessary? I've noticed that they fly extremely weird when they have beadheads, and don't go very far. Also, what types of streamers are commonly hit?

For midges, it seems like there are only a handful of sections you can successfully fish due to the water depth. For the sections that are over 3' in depth, could you just add more tippet to get the midge down there or how does that go? I'm not talking about fishing like 10' holes, more along the lines of 4-6'.

I need every bit of info I can get, so let's have it!
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Old 10-28-2008, 04:01 PM
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Trey,
You will find that typically this time of year the fishing dies down everywhere. The reason for this is the fish's metabolism also slows this time of year. They do not have to eat as much to get through the day. For this reason, they are also less likely to travel very far for a meal, so you must place the fly on their nose.

Regarding your question about streamers and midges. I always tie my streamers with a conehead and wrap the shank with lead wire so it sinks quickly. Does it make a difference? I don't know, it is just personal preference. When fishing a midge in a deep hole, you have to realize that if the hole is 3' deep that putting your indicator 3' up from the fly will not get it to the bottom. The reason is that underwater currents and drag on the fly line will cause the line to take a sagging appearance. So, you may only be fishing 2' deep, but you believe you are deeper. The best way to get deeper is to add more weight by either adding split shot, or my favorite is to add another nymph 12" below the first. This not only doubles your chances at a hookup and allows you to work more of the water column, but also gives additional weight to reduce the sag in your line and have a more vertical presentation.

From my experience when fishing a hole that is around 4' deep, I would put my indicator about 6' above my bottom midge if using 2 size 20 bh zebra midges. A technique and setup I commonly use on the Clinch.

Hope this helps.

Travis
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Old 10-29-2008, 08:26 AM
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Good advice Travis, the only thing i will add, anyday fishing beat's a day at work

Grumpy
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Old 10-29-2008, 05:01 PM
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"You will find that typically this time of year the fishing dies down everywhere." I just simply have to agree! I can tell you that you would probably be better off just staying at home and tying! I, for one, won't be anywhere near water till spring! It's pretty darn cold too, gosh your fly guides will probably freeze and you probably won't do any damage fishing! I'd probably just pick another hobby! Yep, another hobby!

~Brett
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Old 10-29-2008, 09:19 PM
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Now now, that is just not an option Fishing is so much more than the pursuit of fish!

Travis, I like the idea of 3 flies but I would CRY if I got snagged and had to break the line. As Brett suggested, I need to start tying but I think I would get frustrated very fast! I've watched my midge while I was in waist deep water, and I could definitely see that it wasn't as deep as I expected it to be, and that it was following behind the indicator. So, if I just added more tippet on top of that, it would still be deeper than before... Could I add like 3' of tippet and have it 2' down? Seems plausible to me, I just need a yes or no.
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Old 10-29-2008, 10:16 PM
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Longer tippet will equal a shallower drift unless you do the heavier fly or splitshot.

Grumpy
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Old 10-29-2008, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worrgamesguy View Post
Now now, that is just not an option Fishing is so much more than the pursuit of fish!

Travis, I like the idea of 3 flies but I would CRY if I got snagged and had to break the line. As Brett suggested, I need to start tying but I think I would get frustrated very fast! I've watched my midge while I was in waist deep water, and I could definitely see that it wasn't as deep as I expected it to be, and that it was following behind the indicator. So, if I just added more tippet on top of that, it would still be deeper than before... Could I add like 3' of tippet and have it 2' down? Seems plausible to me, I just need a yes or no.
Trey,
That may get you down there. But I prefer to use an indicator so that I can easily adjust my depth until I am just above bottom.

I'm not talking about fishing 3 flies. I am referring to using 2 nymphs and an indicator.

Travis
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Old 10-30-2008, 12:56 AM
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I've never fished the caney, so i can't answer much for that river. I have, however, fished another "midge river" full of big browns in the south holston. i would also say that the winter is my favorite time to fish the soho. one reason being that im away most of the summer because of summer break from college and im here all winter. another is that the big fish seam to become more active and willing in the winter. or maybe they just congregate more in specific areas post spawn. i can point to three or four runs i know hold big fish in late feb or march. do i hook and land this fish, often? heck no. i'll tell you my approach to this river in winter months though.

first i start with a 7.5 ft 5x leader, and tie and about two and a half feet of 5x to a san jaun. split shot above that and indicator way up high on the butt section of the leader. i drop a bwo nymph or black fly nymph or ptail off the san juan on 6x flouro. i look for fast shallow riffles, or noticeable runs and make quite a few good drifts through. i change my dropper to find what pleases the fish. if i can't fool them, i either go deeper (by adding more split shot, or adding a big heavy copper john to my nymph rig) or i go smaller and start fishing sz 20 nymphs and smaller midges or black fly larva. if that all doesnt work, i'll either scope out some flat water and look for risers to which i'll throw a cdc bwo dry with a bwo emerger of some sort or i'll throw wooly buggers or zonkers through the same riffles and runs i was fishing earlier.

i love the winter fishing. its when i catch my biggest fish most often. cold toes, nose, ears, fingers you can't feel. i love every bit of it. you see, the theory i've always heard about tailwater trout is that their metabolism stays about the same because of the near constant water temp coming from the bottom of the dams. the water doesnt fluctuate nearly as much as a freestone stream and therefore the trout are much more willing to take a fly in the winter on a tailwater than on a wild stream. i'd agree with that. the fishing doesnt slow down too bad. tactics may need to change some though. maybe go deeper and smaller. on the soho, black fly larva is a must, post spawn, these fish key in on it, and also a small biot bodied blue wing nymph is deadly. geez i can't wait to freeze to death while catching beautiful browns.
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Old 11-01-2008, 10:22 AM
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Thanks for the great information MTD. I've fished the Caney a half dozen times, mostly on business trip stopovers between home and Nashville. Although I know we're talking frostbite fishing here, one of my greatest pleasures is to be rolling down sticky asphalt on I-40 in July with temperatures breaking 100 and then to drop down off exit 268 and within minutes experience a 30 to 40 degree temperature drop upon stepping into the Caney at the dam. If we could only bottle that, eh.

Dave
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Old 11-01-2008, 04:18 PM
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Default Caney

The Caney Fork has been kind to us this spring and summer. Hopefully fall and winter will give us a fish or two. What colors and sizes do you like on colder weather fly patterns?
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