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Old 02-29-2016, 01:01 PM
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MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
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Lightbulb Norris Dam Sluicing (Feb. 2016 vs. Jan. 2013)

I am curious what most fellow fisherman think of the current uptake in Winter Sluicing Events on the Clinch River.
  • Is it good for refreshing the substrate?
  • Is it bad for the shoreline and water tables?
  • Does it help or harm the fish?
  • How does it impact the sulfur hatch?
The current level of 14,000 CFS is high, but not as bad as the 2013 20,500+ CFS.

Miller's Island Boat Ramp (Jan. 2013)

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Old 02-29-2016, 01:27 PM
Robinryder2 Robinryder2 is online now
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I'm interested in seeing responses to this. I drove over last Thursday and they were sluicing then before the was posted on the app Friday. I've always wondered how great of an impact it had on everything all together.
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:53 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
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No negative impacts from what I've seen in the past. The water is above the usual high water mark so bank impacts are minimal. Plus, the thing that ruins the banks is the water rising and falling not high water.
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Old 02-29-2016, 06:46 PM
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Steve Wright Steve Wright is offline
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Everything will be just fine soon..........

Last edited by Steve Wright; 03-01-2016 at 04:54 PM..
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:31 PM
elkhaircaddis elkhaircaddis is offline
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Trout should be fairly accustomed to it I would think. I suppose with wild fish a flood could wash away a lot of eggs but the trout seem to persevere. Had some buddys float it yesterday but they said they were just soaking up vitamin d on a boat ride
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Old 03-03-2016, 08:50 AM
mstone mstone is offline
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i have often wondered what the high flows do to the grass in the river. That in turn, would affect the insect population, I would think. I know the current should not be as bad on the bottom of the river, but it has to have some impact. Maybe someone can weigh in on this that may have more knowledge than I.
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Old 03-03-2016, 10:09 AM
Joe Congleton Joe Congleton is offline
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Fwiw my observations are generally more about the middle sections to Clinton. l think the higher flows do cut/push/float a lot of sediment in that part of the river;in those sections the beavers have tunneled the banks far more than the past and those tunnels collapse and cause banks and trees to fall in, especially when higher ground is saturated with high flows and sometimes affected by high winds in spring; some places the bottom "weeds" are blown out and others they just get buried in silt and turn brown. What all this does to hatches is debatable-- ok--its all debatable as it is just one persons experienced view, not scientifically proven.

One good thing about moderate high water in deeper sections is that fish seem to prosper in it somehow and longer moderate high water generally means better conditioned fish , although there must be some higher discharge level that reverses the growth as fish have to exert a lot of energy just to stay in place (the 'treadmill' affect). Clinch fish generally don't face the prolonged 24000+-cfs that Cumberland fish endure, and thus are less likely annually to have the Cumby needlefish look in early summer.

Biggest impaction sluicing though is not banks or stream but rather loss of deep cold water inventory. If large amounts of cold water are run out in spring , that can adversely affect water temperatures in late summer and fall when that prior cold water inventory is replaced with warmer spring and summer rainfall. This is clearly more applicable to Holston tailwater than the Clinch but it affects both. Someone who has followed this fairly closely for years says his impression is that quality fall fishing is directly related to the amount of heavy sluice that occurred in spring .

Best thing for a catch and release guy is that high water means less fish go to the deep fat fryer for a couple of months a year.

Last edited by Joe Congleton; 03-03-2016 at 11:15 AM..
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Old 03-03-2016, 08:19 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
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The above post is loaded with inaccurate info based on everything I've ever seen on the Clinch. From my perspective and what I've seen is that the larger flows eliminate the silt that builds up during the low flow months. If anything the extended low water is what causes the greatest deposits of silt into the River system with every rain event and no substantial flow to flush the system.

Last year we had very high flows higher then this year for longer periods and the benthic life along with vegetation has never been so prolific in the time I've spent on the rivers

In addition Norris Lake is fortunate that it rarely if ever has suffered from temp issues except when the lake turnover occurs. We've had tons of flood springs and not once has temp been an issue as a result

Can't believe there are anglers worried about bank dwelling beavers affecting the fishery.....I have seen it all now.....
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:15 AM
elkhaircaddis elkhaircaddis is offline
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^^^hahahhaha!! I have to agree with you there waterwolf. Beavers and trout have only coexisted for a few thousand years
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:02 AM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkhaircaddis View Post
^^^hahahhaha!! I have to agree with you there waterwolf. Beavers and trout have only coexisted for a few thousand years
isn't that the truth, in some places entire fisheries exist because of beavers and their influence.
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