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  #11  
Old 09-01-2009, 10:53 PM
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JohnH0802 JohnH0802 is offline
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I have fished in the Mountains of Idaho, Arizona, California, Colorado, North and South Carolina and Tennesse, not to mention some spring creeks in Pensylvania and some streams in Maryland, and a 5 weight is always a good choice for an all around rod. I have fish both an 8 1/2 and 9' rod, and prefer the 8 1/2 but either is a good choice. The other rod that I have used with great success is a 7'9" far and fine 5 wt and have not had a problem landing even some 24+ inch trout. Find a nice 5 wt that matches a casting style you are comfurtable with (i.e. if you are using and like a fast action rod on your bigger rods then get one in 5 wt.). I prefer the feel of a mid-action rod. I think that the 5wt is a better all around rod that will cover most situations. If you are going to do a lot of fishing in the park on a regular basis you can look at a 4 wt. Whatever you end up with good luck and I hope you have a great trip.
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  #12  
Old 09-01-2009, 11:30 PM
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Troutman Troutman is offline
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Like everyone else, I've got an suggestion also. If you like to high stick nymphs or dapple dry flies then get a long 9ft rod. If you enjoy casting, try a short 6-7ft progressive action 2-3 wt rod. They are a blast to fish. If your worried about over stressing a 12" trout, then your probably fishing too light of a tippet.
When you get home to Florida, take the ultralight out for some bluegill and Cichlid action.
Lots of misrepresentation about the use of " small" rods but there are plenty of accomplished anglers, and authors that use them.
Bill Byrd being one that comes to mind....

http://www.byrdultrafly.com/ulmyths.htm
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  #13  
Old 09-02-2009, 09:06 AM
Carlito Carlito is offline
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Well, this is just too irresistible not to pitch in my two cents...

If you want versatility for here and at home, IMHO you'd be fine with a 4 or 5 weight. I agree with Jim on the length. You gotta pay attention to your surroundings BIG TIME in the Park or you'll waste your entire day getting your gear untangled from the millions of rhododendron that line and hang over every stream in the park. That is the case no matter what length rod you choose. I think the longer rod is a big advantage in the Park because you get a lot more reach... I often fish for hours and hardly false cast at all, and when you are just flipping your line upstream, that extra foot or so gives you a lot more options. I'd bet almost all of the fish that I've caught in the park have been within 20 feet of where I was standing. You really aren't going to be doing MUCH long casting up in the park. For me, the extra rod length is all about reach.

If you want to be able to chunk a heavier streamer or something when you get home, you'd probably be happier with the 5 wt.

Another important question is what reel are you thinking about picking up to go with your new rod?
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  #14  
Old 09-02-2009, 10:37 AM
downtownfish downtownfish is offline
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I knew this would be a topic with a thousand different answers, but I thought I would ask anyway. I am using fast action rods right now. I cast a sage fli 8wt for this bigger stuff in saltwater which is a fast action rod with an alutecnos reel, and a TFO signiture series with a Scienticic anglers system 2 LA for my beater lake setup. I believe the TFO is also considered a fast action rod, but not nearly what the sage is. I am also used to making long cast almost every time, I rarely make short cast, with the exception of a bedding fish by the shore. So I really think a 5wt would be ideal, so I can deliver long cast when I use the rod in florida.
These fish will all be catch and release, if I do catch one.

I really don't know how much fishing I will be doing in the park. I feel like I will be fishing in the morning on the rivers behind the cabins I am staying in, then going to do the hikes, and the touristy stuff through the afternoon. Alarka creek seems kinda tight like a mountain stream, but the little river in town looks very wide open, and would be ideal paired with a long casting rod. It will be a 9ft rod since I am used to casting a 9ft and a 9ft 6in rod. Thanks for your help everyone, and I will look into getting the book to get an idea of what I am in for. I have only done one other stream trip, which was in Cody Wyoming when I was 11 so about 14 years ago, so I honestly know nothing about cold water fishing. I am trying to do as much research as I can before the trip.
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  #15  
Old 09-02-2009, 11:36 AM
Carlito Carlito is offline
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Sounds like you'll be all set when you get here... I really would try to fish up in the park at least one morning if I were you. You really owe it to yourself since you'll be so close. You won't regret it if you get up and out the door before dawn one day and fish something close by.
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  #16  
Old 09-02-2009, 12:25 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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downtownfish--One final thought, after you've losed a torrent of conflicting opinions which are totally typical of the fly-fishing world (and if anyone disagrees with me on what follows they better be ready to present me some "been there, done that" credentials). While Alarka Creek is a great place to stay, don't expect to catch any fish in it. The stockers will long since be gone. The only real exception to that would be to drive to the end of the road, where the stream is tiny, and there are specks there. As an added bonus, a half-mile walk up a manway on the left will put you at the foot of Alarka Creek Falls, a truly spectacular and for some reason, given its ease of access, almost unknown waterfall. You can see a plunge which approaches 200 feet and you are only seeing about half the total drop, as the waterfall/cascade makes a 90-degree turn in mid-plunge. Up above the waterfall is the area known as Big Laurel, a mountain bog with all sorts of unusual plants. The stream here, which is really little more than a branch, is absolutely full of tiny specs. I don't recommend fishing here but the waterfall is well worth the effort of a moderate walk.
As for fishing, Noland Creek, Deep Creek, and the whole Luftee complex are within a half hour or a bit more of where you will be staying. Jim Casada
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  #17  
Old 09-02-2009, 04:30 PM
downtownfish downtownfish is offline
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Jim,
I talked to a local guide and he told me the same thing about not having much luck on Alarka creek. I am staying towards the end of the river by where it dumps into lake fontana so I assume my chances are even slimmer. As bad as it sounds I don't mind being skunked I am kind of used to it. I did read about the waterfall when I was planning the trip, and already have planned to see it, but thank you very much for the insight.
While I have low expectations for Alarka Creek, what will the little river give me?
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  #18  
Old 09-02-2009, 04:59 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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downtownfish--If you fish in Alarka this time of year, pretty much anywhere below the Nantahala National Forest boundary, you are virtually sure to be skunked (at least on trout). As for the river, it has lots of smallmouth, panfish, and non-game fish in it but is far too warm to hold trout. It is also big enough that wade fishing is pretty problematic in most places. I would almost implore you to go to one of the nearby Park streams, but by all means do visit the waterfall. Jim Casada
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  #19  
Old 09-02-2009, 10:21 PM
fearnofishbob fearnofishbob is offline
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Have they got you totally confused ??
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  #20  
Old 09-02-2009, 10:22 PM
downtownfish downtownfish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Casada View Post
downtownfish--If you fish in Alarka this time of year, pretty much anywhere below the Nantahala National Forest boundary, you are virtually sure to be skunked (at least on trout). As for the river, it has lots of smallmouth, panfish, and non-game fish in it but is far too warm to hold trout. It is also big enough that wade fishing is pretty problematic in most places. I would almost implore you to go to one of the nearby Park streams, but by all means do visit the waterfall. Jim Casada
Wow. This just threw a monkey wrench into my plans. I guess I should have done a lot more research.
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