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  #11  
Old 09-08-2009, 09:51 AM
SWAMPUS SWAMPUS is offline
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Default Tippet

When I first started fishing in the park 25 yrs ago,I had the same problem.An old fellow gave me some ROYAL BONNYL mono and said to use as tippet-3' to end of leader.I've been using it ever since.Can't buy it anymore.It's greenish brown and completely disappears in the water.Important when water's gin clear.I forgot one day when I had scrambles brains from work,but remembered when I settled down and promptly started catching again! i use 9' tapered leaders +3' RB so prev post is righr on.Long leaders.God knows I ain't much on stealth,but walk soft and carry a big,long whippy stick.Oh,and when all else fails try an Orange Asher-aka Orange Palmer.Have you ever curled ribbon with a knife?Try same on dryfly tails.Curls em up like the naturals!
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  #12  
Old 09-08-2009, 10:30 AM
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pmike pmike is offline
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Default Curtis Creek Manifesto

LRO used to and I believe, still does carry the book Curtis Creek Manifesto and they have free shipping.

Mike
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  #13  
Old 09-08-2009, 12:02 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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rockytopwoolybugger--For starters, take heart in the fact that once you reach a reasonable degree of proficiency in Park waters, you can catch trout most anywhere. I've been privileged to fish in a lot of wonderful places on three continents and New Zealand, and with the possible exception of slow-moving limestone streams under certain conditions, it doesn't get any tougher.
That being said, there's a great deal of useful wisdom in other responses. Some of it I'll repeat; and some will be new.
1. Go with a guide or someone who is really good. A day astream with a masterful angler can teach you a great deal.
2. Study to learn favored holding spots. There's no substitute for being able to read water.
3. Although no one has mentioned it, conditions change with the seasons--for example, you need a much longer leader and finer tippet this time of year than you do in late April.
4. You have to stoop to conquer; i.e., keep a low profile.
5. Bright is not right. Camo or earth tone clothing, dull colored lines, and caps which blend in are the ticket.
6. Roll cast most of the time, and a longer rod lets you do this better. If you aren't false casting you aren't scaring fish.
7. There's no substitute for building time. That is to say, you learn as you go. After almost 60 years at it in the Park, I think I'm just about ready to move from kindergarten to first grade. IN truth, one of the delights of fishing in the Park is, as Horace Kephart once wrote, realization that "in the school of the outdoors there is no graduation day."
8. Use as long a leader as you are comfortable with handling.
9. In my opinion, most folks fish too slow in most Park waters. Your first cast is the most important, and each succeeding one lessens the likelihood of a strike.
10. You'll catch more fish by placing heavy reliance on shank's mare. If you aren't familiar with the term, it refers to using your legs to walk--get back of beyond.
I devote a great deal of time and thought in my recent book to the various issues you raise, and I would hope you'll read it. Whether or not that is the case though, you can take heart in knowing you are fishing a beautiful part of the world, casting to wild fish, and floating flies by lots of trout. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com
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  #14  
Old 09-08-2009, 12:17 PM
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BlueRaiderFan BlueRaiderFan is offline
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Wow, 60 years fishing the park. I can't imagine doing anything that long. Incredible.
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  #15  
Old 09-08-2009, 12:25 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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Blue RaiderFan--Those six decades are the product of several factors--being blessed by having a father who was a fly fisherman (he's still living, turned 100 last month and still loves to talk about his years of fishing); living within walking distance of the Park; having parents who were sufficiently trusting to let me, from a quite young age, venture out on my own; having as my best fishing buddy in boyhood the son of a Park ranger; growing up in an era when things like fishing and hunting were what boys did (we didn't have a television and the phone was a party line one which I almost never used); having a whole host of unofficial mentors who gladly showed me the way. I've been blessed, and at the age of 67 I have enough perspective and can look back far enough to realize as much. Jim Casada
P. S. I just hope there's another decade or two yet to add to those 60 years!
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  #16  
Old 09-08-2009, 12:37 PM
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BlueRaiderFan BlueRaiderFan is offline
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Sounds like you've stayed active and have a few good years left in ya' I'm trying to do the same. I've had some health issues that have slowed me down, but I'm slowly getting back to normal. One day soon, I will be able to head far up the trails like the rest of the fellas. Like a wise man once told me: "You stop movin', you die." So it's good you are so active. I can imagine the park (Townsend etc) looked a lot different 60 years ago. I wish I could have seen it. Got any old pictures in your book of your fishing adventures?
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  #17  
Old 09-08-2009, 12:51 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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BlueRaiderFan--While there are a bunch of vintage photographs, including a fair number from pre-Park days, there's only one of me from the halycyon days of youth (loaded down with enough gear to camp for a month). That's one of my lasting regrets--that I didn't take more photos as a youngster. At least I've spent a lot of time as an adult making up for lost ground searching down vintage photos and in wielding a camera. Another regret is that I didn't record or at least write down my countless conversations with old timers. I remember a lot of it, but there's so much more that is lost forever. Still, I realize I was blessed just to have contact with so many wonderful fishermen and fly tiers. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com
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  #18  
Old 09-08-2009, 01:08 PM
Carlito Carlito is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tlshealy View Post
Also make sure that you fish late afternoon, I've fished serveral times early and mid day and had to work very hard for a few fish, but around 3:00 or 4:00 in the afternoon on the same water, fish would just turn on and start hitting drys on every nice section of water.
Tad
Although I often find that 4:00 is a great hour for fishing, you can catch fish all day long up in the Park. I am no expert, but IMHO it is more important to avoid fishing behind another angler than to worry about what time it is. The best way to do that is to hit the stream right at the crack of dawn. However, that isn't necessary by any means.

My last thought on the subject is that it is impossible to over estimate the value of a mentor. You can read about fishing all day and there is no substitute for time on the water, but the instruction of an experienced angler is the fastest route to fishing success.
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  #19  
Old 09-08-2009, 01:46 PM
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Carolina Boy Carolina Boy is offline
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Patience is a neccesity when you start chasing fish in the park. When I first started flyfishing I was not aware of tailwaters so I learned how to fish in the park, not the easiest but i wouldn't have iit any other way, I have no idea how many fishless trips I had when I started but it was a lot of weekends. I spent so much more time untangling a mess than actually fishing. But I have never been one to quit, and I am stubborn. Funny thing is at some point it was like a light switch went off and I started having more and more success. I by no means no anything but I think that is the attitude you need to take so you can learn everytime your out there. Before you know it you will be wearin em out! So patience and probably a good idea to stay outta the water as much as you can wear dark clothes and stay low!
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  #20  
Old 09-08-2009, 01:47 PM
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pmike pmike is offline
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Default Temperature and barometric pressure

Variations in temp and pressure can also affect feeding patterns. I have found that fish tend to strike more readily on a cooler day after a few degrees rise in temperature, than they do on a warm day after the temp drops several degrees. I also tend to look for sunnier runs to fish and seem to do better. I am guessing that part of the reason for more active fishing in the sunlit areas, often has to do with hatches.

I also always tend to start out with a dry/dropper rig to test the waters and see what the fish are leaning toward. I have had fish take nymphs and sub-surface flies when by the conditions it seemed they should be taking dries. I have seen the opposite as well.

I agree with Mr. Casada, especially with his observation that if you become proficient in fishing the park, that you will find it easier if not easy to catch fish elsewhere, his thought, my words.

Hang in there, the reward is well worth the work!

Mike
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