Home Register Today's Posts Members User CP Calendar FAQ

Go Back   Little River Outfitters Forum > Fly Fishing Board > Smoky Mountain Fishing

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:05 PM
tjw37909 tjw37909 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Co
Posts: 264
Default Advice on flies

I have been fly fishing for 4 months and need to know what flies I should stock up on for Fall and Winter. I plan on buying Jim Casada's new book and the little book from LRO on hatches and seasons. I am sure both of those will help tremendously, but, until then, any advice on what to buy whould be great. Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-10-2009, 11:11 PM
Carolina Boy's Avatar
Carolina Boy Carolina Boy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Waynesville NC
Posts: 515
Default

You are certainly on the right on track buying Mr. Casada's new book. I must say that while at LRO pick up the Roger Lowe streamside hatch chart/guide, it is great to have in your pack or vest, especially when starting out. I was fortunate to learn to tie flies under the instruction of Mr. Lowe and let me tell you he is a authority on these hills, and can sure wrap a hook! Best part is it fits in your pack! it shortens the learning curve. you read a book and learn technique and strategy, but when you go to the shop and look at trays with zillions of flies and the crazy names of patterns and you don't know the difference between a chernoble ant and a clouser minnow, and what the **** is a BWO?? sulphur doesn't that smell like eggs? it can be overwhelming and we all know what i am saying, SO you get this little book/guide and then you look at it and not only can you ask the fine people at flyshops where what you want is, you can actually learn what you ask for looks like! HA awesome!
__________________
If it swims throw a fly at it!

Barry Murphy
828-400-3335 (Cell)

www.projecthealingwaters.org
"Healing Those Who Serve"
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-11-2009, 12:29 AM
tjw37909 tjw37909 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Co
Posts: 264
Default

yes it has all been pretty confusing. it is frustrating starting out asnd wondering if you are not catching fish because you have the wrong fly, the wrong technique, or any combination of the two. i believe i am slowly getting a slight grasp on it but can see that i have tons left to learn. i think i glanced at the Lowe book the last time I was at LRO but left it on the shelf since i had already spent almost 300 dollars that day in there on some flies and a new temple fork rod to replace my walmart rig
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-11-2009, 08:22 AM
silvercreek's Avatar
silvercreek silvercreek is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Mid Tennessee
Posts: 894
Default

Yes it is terribly confusing at first. Hang in there. If possible I suggest you partner with an experieced fisherman or woman, or hire a guide if money permits. Join a flyfishing club if one is around where you live. You'll learn lots of stuff from such folks. If not you can learn it on your own. Main advice, be observant. Look for relationships between everything connected to the fish and the water they inhabit. Enjoy your time on the stream.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-11-2009, 08:39 AM
Rebelsoul Rebelsoul is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Dickson Co. TN
Posts: 161
Default

In all the years of fishing warm water streams I never thought much about bugs....they were something that bit you.
Crawfish,or minnows was the bait,a bug was just a bug.
The knowledge of hatches,when,where and what kind is something that is overwhelming to me also,I plan on getting the Smoky Mountain hatch book as a guide.
But are the nymphs of most types of flies available to trout in the Smokies most of the time?
Guess I need the book.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-11-2009, 08:51 AM
silvercreek's Avatar
silvercreek silvercreek is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Mid Tennessee
Posts: 894
Default

Yep. Nymphs are available year round to the trout, but they hide out under rocks and generally do their best not to be so available they get gobbled up. However when they must migrate the surface or to dry land in the case of some bugs, like some stoneflies, they are most vulnerable to trout. Day in and day out nymphing is the most productive way to fish. By the way, I fish dry flies almost exclusively. Just the way I like to fish and I am willing to accept a smaller chance of catching trout for the rush of seeing them take the fly on top. Go figure.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-11-2009, 10:37 AM
nvr2L8's Avatar
nvr2L8 nvr2L8 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Maryville, TN
Posts: 1,063
Default

tjw,

The first year that I started fly fishing, I stuck almost exclusively with a Parachute Adams. You really can't go wrong with a PA in any season. By staying with one fly, I was able to focus on technique rather than fly selection. Just a thought.
__________________
Charlie B

His eye is on the sparrow and I know He watches me.
bartonca@hotmail.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-11-2009, 10:57 AM
Rog 1's Avatar
Rog 1 Rog 1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tallahassee, Florida
Posts: 884
Default

Good piece of advice...when I first started fishing all I ever used was a Ginger Quill dry fly....I caught fish on this fly spring, summer and fall...made life a lot simpler....had to learn to put this fly where the fish were...only later did I learn that there were other selections to go to....
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-11-2009, 11:00 AM
Carolina Boy's Avatar
Carolina Boy Carolina Boy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Waynesville NC
Posts: 515
Default

I would say the order of importance is wading and approach followed by cast/presentation and then pattern when it comes to the park. Again Rogers little pocket hatch chart is great, plus when you are starting out you can take it in the shop and find what is suggested without luggin a larger book in there. Oh and to further the Parachute Adams talk if you havent fished or heard of it try the Klinkhammer, It is a parachute pattern but it is on a curved hook shank it allows the hook to sit lower in the surface film, butter hook up ratio, big in Europe Just slayed the Browns in Ireland using em. I think Byron selles em, and I know he has the hooks if you tie. I love em you will find that even when everything is right sometimes in the park due to the erradic water fish will simply miss this helps and the fish doesn't have to come as hi outta the water to sip it, they feel better and you will too! But fish it barbless sometimes due to its float level fish can take it deep. So pack them hemos!
__________________
If it swims throw a fly at it!

Barry Murphy
828-400-3335 (Cell)

www.projecthealingwaters.org
"Healing Those Who Serve"
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-11-2009, 11:04 AM
Rebelsoul Rebelsoul is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Dickson Co. TN
Posts: 161
Default

I keep seeing several people say that the Adams/Parachute Adams,is their all time favorite...I've tended to use it more often than others because of the experienced anglers saying that.
As far as nymphs go,the Tellico is the one I try most often.
I like old fashioned things,learning history is a big thing to me and after reading some of Jim Casada's new book last night and the history he includes on all things pertaining to fishing in the Smokies,I would like to collect as many of the traditional fly patterns as I can and try them,doing something like that just adds to the fishing experience for me.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:50 AM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.