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  #11  
Old 11-10-2009, 09:25 AM
Rebelsoul Rebelsoul is offline
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Since I'm new at this also,one of the things that challenges a newby when asking where to fish,is actually remembering the creek names that everyone talks about and finding them on the map.Then figuring out where to fish where everybody and his brother doesn't.
I'm a big believer in topo maps,and I guess I'm a map junkie,I study them and when I fish a stream,then I hi-lite where I fish and make some notes.
Where to go is really not the big question,but what to do when you get there,now that's what counts.
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  #12  
Old 11-10-2009, 12:12 PM
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jeffnles1 jeffnles1 is offline
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I'm so very envious of the guys who get to fish the mountains more regularly. I haven't fished nearly as many streams as I would like nor have I spent anywhere the amount of time in the mountains as my heart desires.

I do like fishing up Tremont and sometimes up Thunderhead prong. I like the Greenbriar area (I really enjoy Porters Creek) and the West Prong Little Pigeon river just above the picnic area at Chimneys is a lot of fun.

To be honest, I can't say I have a favorite place as they are all my favorites for different reasons.

For me, fishing in the Smokeys isn't about catching, it really is about fishing. Just being there on a stream, the sounds, smells, the cool of the air is what makes me love being there. The hills are a thousand shades of green. It's amazing to me to see how many different colors of green exist and how many colors of gray and brown and every other color in the rainbow. Just standing by a stream, hearing the water and lookig around me is far more important than catching the fish. The catching is just a bonus but soaking in the beauty around me and recharging my severly drained batteries is what fishing is to me and it's especially so when I get to fish in the Smokeys.

I know it's not the answer to the original question but in a way, I think it is the ultimate answer to the question.

Jeff
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  #13  
Old 11-10-2009, 12:23 PM
pineman19 pineman19 is offline
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Greenbriar is a beautiful place. Went up there Sunday afternoon on a beautiful day and caught a few brookies and a my best wild bow of the season up above the Ramsey Prong trailhead.


Neal
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  #14  
Old 11-10-2009, 02:30 PM
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Grannyknot Grannyknot is offline
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TroutVol, my advice would be to pick up some maps and do some exploring for yourself. It is much more rewarding that way, in my opinion. The national park service offers a free map online.....http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisi...ntry%20Map.pdf and trails illustrated makes a great map of the park, with all the stream names. Most substantial drainages in the park hold at least 1 species of trout, and some have all 3.

The following link --->http://www.dlia.org/atbi/science/park_quad_maps.shtml will give you access to some older topo maps of the area, showing you some of the older "manways" to help access the drainages that aren't frequently traveled by hikers.

I know that some forum members will scoff at the fact that I provide those links, but these are easily found with a little search engine help.

I do understand the sentiments of some members that say we should not be naming streams. When you drive hours to fish a place like Sam's Creek, get to the mouth of the stream and notice wet boot prints all over the rocks leading up into the drainage, it really gives you a sinking feeling and you know that you might as well find another place to fish.
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  #15  
Old 11-10-2009, 03:20 PM
pineman19 pineman19 is offline
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Grannyknot,

I know that feeling. I have roughly a 1 1/2 hr drive to the TN side. I drove to Greenbriar several months ago, hiked approximately 35-40 minutes, got in the stream and saw wet bootprints. Pretty dissapointing for sure and I had some equipment issues as well.

I have stayed away from the more easily accessed spec streams like Sams and Road Prong for that reason. Too much gas and time wasted if someone is already fishing ahead.


Neal
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  #16  
Old 11-10-2009, 03:50 PM
TroutVol TroutVol is offline
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Thanks for all the suggestions, I look foward to gettin' out there and exploring
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  #17  
Old 11-10-2009, 04:07 PM
pineman19 pineman19 is offline
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TRoutVol,

I recommend buying a National Geographics map of the Smokies to start with, they are around $10, they are waterproof, and are an invaluable resource. I am a forester, so I love reading topo maps. Buy a couple of the books on fishing in the Smokies. Like others have said I enjoy using these resources to find new fishing spots and to me it's a lot more fun than being led to a spot by a fellow fisherman, although a few tips have been very beneficial.

Enjoy the Quest!
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  #18  
Old 11-10-2009, 07:00 PM
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sammcdonald sammcdonald is offline
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look for books and maps at the park stores or
www.smokiesinformation.org

money goes to the park.
__________________
I started with nothing, and I have most of it left.
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  #19  
Old 11-10-2009, 08:19 PM
The Principal The Principal is offline
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Go to the fly shops and ask questions, also read! The Flyfisherman's
Guide To The Great Smoky Mountains National Park By H. Lea Lawrence ,
Fly-Fishing Guide to the Great Somky Mountains By Don Kirk, Great Somky Mountains
National Park Angler's Companion By Ian Rutter, And the very best, Fly Fishing in the Great Smoky Mountians National Park An Insiders Guidetoa Pursuit Of Passion By
Jim Casada
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  #20  
Old 11-10-2009, 08:25 PM
The Principal The Principal is offline
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I also forgot to mention to get a copy of a North Carolina and a Tennesee
Atlas & Gazetteer.
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