Home Register Today's Posts Members User CP Calendar FAQ

Go Back   Little River Outfitters Forum > Fly Fishing Board > Boats, Canoes and Kayaks

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 07-08-2010, 11:30 AM
Troutman's Avatar
Troutman Troutman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Seymour, TN
Posts: 1,277
Default Skiffs vs standard drifters

I fished out of one of these RO skiffs http://www.rodriftboats.com/Ro-Skiff.html on the madison river years ago. Was wondering why you don't see more people using them around here. seems like it would be perfect for the rivers around here. It was easy to enter and exit from when you wanted to anchor and jump out to wade fish as opposed to a couple of high side drifters I've been in.
What do you guys think? Do you think skiffs would be as good as a standard drifter on the area rivers? Hyde makes a nice one also. http://hydeoutdoors.com/boats/new/skiff
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 07-08-2010, 01:36 PM
Wilson10's Avatar
Wilson10 Wilson10 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Clinton, TN
Posts: 292
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Troutman View Post
I fished out of one of these RO skiffs http://www.rodriftboats.com/Ro-Skiff.html on the madison river years ago. Was wondering why you don't see more people using them around here. seems like it would be perfect for the rivers around here. It was easy to enter and exit from when you wanted to anchor and jump out to wade fish as opposed to a couple of high side drifters I've been in.
What do you guys think? Do you think skiffs would be as good as a standard drifter on the area rivers? Hyde makes a nice one also. http://hydeoutdoors.com/boats/new/skiff

I've never fished out of a skiff, but would agree that they would seem to be easy to enter and exit from. They seem like good boats and would probably fit well with the tailwaters of our area.
__________________
Adam
awilson1010@gmail.com

My Blog: Fly Fish East Tennessee
www.flyfisheasttennessee.blogspot.com

><>
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 07-08-2010, 02:40 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,202
Default

The problem is the exiting, and by exiting I mean being tossed out or falling out. None of the low side boats I have seen or fished out are worth owning. Around here, there is no reason to float and wade, thus worrying about exiting the boat is only of concern a couple of times during the day.

High sided boats are easy to get out of, and also provide some level of security.

I looked at the RO boats and was not impressed with their quality, layout and durability.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-08-2010, 03:35 PM
Knothead Knothead is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: SE Tennessee
Posts: 644
Default

I think a PFD is required in Tennessee. Check with the TWRA Boating Division, 615-781-6682. I have floated a couple of times and I was furnished an inflatable PFD that looks like a fanny pack.
__________________
John Torchick
http://www.hiwasseecustomrods.com
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-08-2010, 04:32 PM
Troutman's Avatar
Troutman Troutman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Seymour, TN
Posts: 1,277
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by waterwolf View Post
The problem is the exiting, and by exiting I mean being tossed out or falling out. None of the low side boats I have seen or fished out are worth owning. Around here, there is no reason to float and wade, thus worrying about exiting the boat is only of concern a couple of times during the day.

High sided boats are easy to get out of, and also provide some level of security.

I looked at the RO boats and was not impressed with their quality, layout and durability.
I'm surprised that you don't stop and wade on the shoals and the channels around islands, especially on the smallie rivers. You know that some of those channels hold fish that never see an angler fishing from boats. I guess I'm just used to doing that from the canoe since I can't really anchor down in current like a drifter can.
One thing that I remember from the guide telling me when I was floating with him in the RO skiff, was that I had to stay centered in the boat as we were drifting. I would turn sideways at times and he would fuss. said it was hard to keep the boat tracking correctly or something. Maybe he just didn't want me to fall out!
Anyways , good info.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 07-08-2010, 05:36 PM
MadisonBoats's Avatar
MadisonBoats MadisonBoats is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norris, TN
Posts: 1,903
Default

I think it is good to be able to float and wade from a boat. I feel it is a completely different experience on the water. Also, it is nice when two or more fly fisherman want to free up their casting restrictions. Sometimes it is good to get out and help the boat through some shoals.

MB Boats coming soon...
__________________
“Every human has four endowments- self awareness, conscience, independent will, & creative imagination.
These give us the ultimate human freedom... The
power
to choose, to respond, to change.”


Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 07-08-2010, 10:45 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Troutman View Post
I'm surprised that you don't stop and wade on the shoals and the channels around islands, especially on the smallie rivers. You know that some of those channels hold fish that never see an angler fishing from boats. I guess I'm just used to doing that from the canoe since I can't really anchor down in current like a drifter can.
One thing that I remember from the guide telling me when I was floating with him in the RO skiff, was that I had to stay centered in the boat as we were drifting. I would turn sideways at times and he would fuss. said it was hard to keep the boat tracking correctly or something. Maybe he just didn't want me to fall out!
Anyways , good info.
I yell at folks in my boat as well to stay centered, the slightest lean and the boat leans to that side digging that oar deeper and making it hard to row. In shallow water it causes the chine to dive and seek out rocks to smash into.

We float pretty long distances and spending time wading is time we don't have. Plus in my own experiences wading for smallmouth is not nearly as productive as drifting through. My goal is to cover lots of water, high grading the best lies along the way.

I pretty much refuse to get out to walk the boat through shoals, unless there is no choice and dragging is the only option. I will ram anything if I think there is a chance of success and not having to get out and fight the boat and river.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 07-09-2010, 07:58 AM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,202
Default

Editing for duplication........

Last edited by waterwolf; 07-09-2010 at 08:00 AM.. Reason: Duplicate
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 09-08-2010, 11:27 PM
Rick_in_AL Rick_in_AL is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MadisonBoats View Post
I think these are probably my favorites for tail-waters. I like the layout and they float very shallow. Have you ever had any issues with tears or punctures?

Something neat I found on the 'Net:
I wish I had one of these so I would not have to go upstream from the church. Looks like a cool idea. You could fly upstream and just drift back down with out having to worry about another vehicle. Only drawback is limited cargo and passenger weight. Anyone ever seen one of these on a lake or river? Not bad to have a boat and a plane for $15-25k and trailer.
I saw one of these last spring, flying down the beach in Destin Florida. I had never heard of one before...Really amasing to see when you're not expecting it. I had just driven over an hour one way to our fishing spot close to Panama City...Kinda makes you want one until you see the price.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-14-2011, 05:53 PM
Petey's Avatar
Petey Petey is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 89
Default Drift Boats

Not sure if this subject is dead or not. But thought I would offer a little different point of view from somebody that rows a little different boat.

I have rowed Hydes and Clacka's low and high sides in the past. So I am not going to go into that as Waterwolf gave a really good description of both.

What I do row and have rowed for the past 5 years is a Boulder Boat Works drift boat. The boat is made primarily of HDPE, and is welded using the plastic weld technology. It is not a rotomold like the Hog, therefore not nearly as bulky or cumbersome. The gunnels are oak, the casting decks and ribbing is mahogony. She is a high side boat 17 feet in length. I have rowed the Hiwassee, part of the Colorado, the Clinch, Holston, South Holston and Watauga in it. High water on some low water on others. I have taken some nasty hits and put her in places that made me pucker.

The Pro's, the boat is about bomb proof. The plastic make up of the boat is extremely strong. It is giving but not soft by any means. The slick bottom allows me to belly up to and slide over rocks that I see many aluminum and fiberglass boats get stuck on. My version also has full bench storage under the front seat and rowers position. So there is plenty of dry storage. She is a little bigger boat than most on the water which allows more room to move and gear to store. Also the seats that came it are some the most comfortable that I have ever set on. It is easy to clean and doesn't hold water stain. It has classic lines and is very easy on the eyes. Not sure about the Hog Islands, but my boat has never warped.

The Cons, she is heavy. Not tremendously so, but her size and weight make her float a tad deeper. Which makes her not as nimble. Once you get her on top of the water she will hold, but it takes a good pull to do so. I have 8.5 foot oars, I could see myself easily switching over to 9 or 9.5. While she isn't easly pushed by the wind, you have to be true on your line when dealing with fast water. Because once you are in it you are committed. Also the wood work requires more time and maintance seasonly. The varnish will wear off and you find yourself sanding and reapplying every so often. One day (luckily not anytime soon) the chine will need to be worked on, so finding a person that works with HDPE is not quite as easy as finding someone that works with Fiberglass.

All in all I have enjoyed her.

Boulder Boat Works offers varying packages and customizing what you want is not hard.

http://www.boulderboatworks.com/bbw_driftboats.html

I don't sell them, I make nothing off of them. Just thought I would provide a link so you could check them out.

Petey
__________________
You can't depend on your judgement when your imagination is out of focus. - Mark Twain
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:24 PM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.