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Old 11-30-2010, 10:02 PM
2weightfavorite 2weightfavorite is offline
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Default brown trout spawn..

Well, the Little is rolling at 5230 feet per second... I hate to say it, but I believe all the spwaning done up untill now has been in vain. I can't see where any young could possibly survive these water levels, and any recent red with eggs would abviously be blown out. Its a real shame, because last week with the full moon, I saw alot of fish in the tails, and I saw alot of reds... Sure hope there are enough late spawners to still have a semi successfull fall. I guess we will find out in the years to come..
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Old 12-01-2010, 09:26 AM
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It is unfortunate, especially in some of our Cherokee national forest streams where their populations are becoming almost non-exsistant. I guess it's just nature running it's course.

Makes you wonder how Rainbows can ever be successful as they deal with heavy spring rains nearly every year.
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Old 12-01-2010, 10:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grannyknot View Post
It is unfortunate, especially in some of our Cherokee national forest streams where their populations are becoming almost non-exsistant. I guess it's just nature running it's course.

Makes you wonder how Rainbows can ever be successful as they deal with heavy spring rains nearly every year.

That is an interesting thought about the rainbows.... How much flow does it take to blowout a spawn? Is it more due to how quickly the water comes up or total flow, and how much can it go up before it decimates next years young? I don't know if anyone has thoroughly studied this or not.
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Old 12-01-2010, 10:31 AM
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I'd be interested if you went back to the same places you have witnessed the redds to see how they look once the water subsides. I would guess that nature will do it's thing and alot of the redds are in areas where gravel accumulates naturally behind obstructions. As most of you know when water rises and gets really fast, the water on the bottom rarely changes. It is only the upper water column that is really raging. Those redds that are behind natural obstructions like small boulders etc. are probably for the most part unharmed. I could and very well maybe wrong but it would be interesting to get some first hand knowledge of to what happened to some of the known redds that ya'll have seen.
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Old 12-01-2010, 08:31 PM
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I would think they are a little more resiliant than we're giving them credit for. A fall spawning fish has evolved over tens of thousands of years and hard rains and high water this time of year is not that unusual.

I may be 100% wrong, but something tells me that they are a lot tougher than we think.

Jeff
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Old 12-02-2010, 01:01 AM
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Ditto jeffnless1. Spot on.
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Old 12-02-2010, 01:30 AM
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I wish someone with some real expertise would speak to this. At some point these fertilized eggs have to be washed away. I know one of my favorite rivers in WNC had a flow briefly of almost the same amount. Remember, the brown trout and brookies have just spawned. I was still seeing females guarding the newly laid eggs.
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Old 12-02-2010, 09:35 AM
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Ian Rutter posted over on SEFF about working over on Lynn Camp after the brook trout restoration and how their was plenty of high water during and after the spawn last year and shocking studies performed this spring/summer showed that the fish did well.
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Old 12-02-2010, 09:40 AM
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Yeah it seems like some biologists could test this in a simulated tank with rocks on the bottom. Put some eggs in there and then increase the flow to x amount and see what happens on the bottom. Like with anything I would guess "it depends" some spots would be just fine where others would get more churn from the layout of falls, rocks, etc and be more at risk. There was 3 inches of rain in the smokies (at newfound gap) over the recent 2 day period. To me that isn't uncommon at all in November up there. You are right Greg about the high water last year it seemed like the rain never stopped. Anyway I hope you are wrong and it wasn't all in vain 2weight but maybe only time will tell.
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Old 12-02-2010, 10:13 AM
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Low water is more of an issue than high water, generally speaking.

Think about where they are laying the eggs, in gravel. And then they move more gravel on top of the eggs. More gravel on top is just more protection. Silt from high flows can be an issue but most trout streams in the Mtns that is a non-issue.
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