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  #11  
Old 02-18-2011, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by 2weightfavorite View Post
...Out of curiosity, what strain of brook trout did they put in? ...
They put in the southern strain of brook trout... imported from elsewherein the Park. He can speak for himself, but I don't think Buzz was saying "southern strain of brook trout" in contrast to the native species.

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Old 02-18-2011, 09:23 AM
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JoeFred, that was us. I'll be sure to find you this year at Troutfest.

Bran, what really amazed me, was how fast these trout rebounded back to carrying capacity after a drought/flood. They sure are tough.

2weightfavorite/Jim, I don't have answers to your questions. There's a public meeting March 3 in Townsend. Matt and Steve were very open with information, you may want to attend and ask these questions.

Knik, They never really said specifically, but one thing they did cover was that when trout reach a certain size, they actually decrease in weight during certain time periods, due to there being a lack of food (browns excluded). I have a feeling that has something to do with it.

One thing that I forgot to mention is that a decent portion of the presentation that has to do with acid rain. 12 streams are on some list (scientific name) that are endangered due to low pH levels. Even though the air quality has gotten better over the years, the particles from the past have soaked into the ground and are being leached into our streams and still causing a problem.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Jim Casada View Post
Were you given any information on the specific streams surveyed, how it was done, when it was done, and who did it?
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com
People are posting faster than I can answer.

Matt showed slides on several streams, but did not go into great detail about how they gathered data. It was an hour long presentation and they covered alot of information, so they didn't get too detailed about it.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:30 AM
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People are posting faster than I can answer.
We're like feeders in a major mayfly hatch...
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:31 AM
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Does anyone know if any other streams are going to be restored or is this the last one?
Adam, They had a list of several more streams that were going to be restored. If I remember correctly it was around 40 more miles of stream. For comparision, they restrored 8 miles along Lynn Camp Prong.

*Disclaimer* I'm going by memory with these figures, so they may be nowhere near correct.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:31 AM
Crockett Crockett is offline
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Now back to the important stuff...

"Terrestrials (sp.) make up most of a trout's diet, by a very large percentage."

That is kind of surprising too for me anyway. Seems like I only go to terrestrials in the summer as per conventional wisdom. Maybe I should rethink that strategy. I noticed a lot of winter fishing pics on another board, frequented by western NC folks, where they were using green weenies.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:34 AM
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We're like feeders in a major mayfly hatch...
I'm going to work, so you guys are on your own for the next couple hours.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Crockett View Post
Now back to the important stuff...

"Terrestrials (sp.) make up most of a trout's diet, by a very large percentage."

That is kind of surprising too for me anyway. Seems like I only go to terrestrials in the summer as per conventional wisdom. Maybe I should rethink that strategy. I noticed a lot of winter fishing pics on another board, frequented by western NC folks, where they were using green weenies.
One last thing before work.

I didn't present all the facts. The slide showing terrestrials making up most of a trouts diet only showed the summer months. I don't think they showed anything showing a winter trouts diet. They did show us where a trout puts on most of its weight from fall through spring as compared to spring through fall. The larger trout actually lost weight from spring through fall and gained from fall through spring.

I'm out of here.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:00 AM
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buzz--Thanks, and obviously you've got to make a living (so have a good day at work). I would love to attend one of the presentations, but a six-hour trip to Tennessee is too much for me. Did they give any indication as to whether there would be a presentation in N. C.?
This side of the Park is the focal point, it would seem, of most of the skepticism about otters and, for that matter, other things. It invariably seems that the N. C. side gets fewer hearings, fewer presentations, less money, and less attention. If I sound a bit disillusioned in that regard, I am, but my feelings pale in comparison to those of others in Swain County who constantly have issues with the Park. I'll offer just one example. Several years ago the low water bridge on Hazel Creek washed out (or some say the Park removed it--I have no way of knowing although the last time I crossed it the bridge seemed structurally fine). The superintendnet assured folks it would be promptly replaced, something which is important because access to cemeteries without the bridge is pretty much out of the question for the elderly when Fontana is low. As of this writing nothing has been done. There are many other examples.

But if a N. C. presentation was mentioned, or if you know where such information can be found on the Park web site (I didn't find it, but I'm anything but a computer whiz), I would make every effort to travel to the meeting.

Many thanks.

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  #20  
Old 02-18-2011, 10:08 AM
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the stocking of otters to me is alot like the 33 billion dollar gov stimulus to big corporations. They have to say that everything is better, that it all worked as planned. They cannot say "well we're sorry, we were wrong, it was all a mistake" No matter what the otters are actually doing they will always defend the re introduction of them. Like Jim said, until serious examination (videoing or killing and examining) of otters is done, we will never know the real facts. Not to mention, Id say that we will never know for sure anyway. Every river is different, some may have more crayfish, some more newts and salamaders. Id say the diet of otters varies greatly from river to river.
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