Home Register Today's Posts Members User CP Calendar FAQ

Go Back   Little River Outfitters Forum > Fly Fishing Board > Tennessee Trout Streams and Tailwaters

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-05-2011, 11:35 AM
Trico Trico is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 118
Default Floating Clinch above Weir Dam

Not knowing anything about fishing the steams in Ten. I went with a guide my first few times. It was fall and we floated the Clinch near the dam and above the weir. One generator was going. We took out below the weir. The guide simply went over the weir dam in the drift boat. I was wondering does anyone else do this? I have went thru chutes that were worse out West. After going over it several times It appears to be easy enough as long as you kept the boat straight.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:46 PM
Rodonthefly Rodonthefly is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 392
Default

Well its something I wouldn't do in my boat, but I have seen it done. If I'm not mistaken it is against the law. I would say TVA would fine you pretty good if they caught you doing so. Be carefull .
__________________
www.clinchriverflyfishing.com
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:53 PM
duckypaddler's Avatar
duckypaddler duckypaddler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
Posts: 1,182
Exclamation Weir Dams are killers

The particular weir you are talking about is a much newer design that is most likely safer, but I wouldn't attempt it unless you really knew what you were doing. In over 12+ years of paddling whitewater, the only place I really thought I might have drown was on the weir dam from Big Creek leading to the Pigeon. Someone roped me out (pays to play with other who take rescue classes annually), and saved my butt. It took uf 45 minutes, and a tethered swiimer to recover my boat. This was with people who were much better trained than the rescue squad.

If you keep your forward momentum and are able to maintain speed you will most likely plop through there like it was nothing. On the other hand, scrape on something and lose speed, or change you angle slightly, and it may be the last move you ever make

The first things paddlers are educated to are the dangers or strainers (downed trees), Undercut rocks (Plateau if full of them), sieves (rock strainer), recirculating hydraulics (don't spit you out), Flood waters, and WEIR DAMS.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:58 PM
Flat Fly n's Avatar
Flat Fly n Flat Fly n is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: East TN
Posts: 533
Default

Exactly, weir dams are more dangerous because there is no outlet. Some say you can actually swim to the bottom and out, but who could keep there head in the game at time like that? I couldn't.
__________________
I am a great admirer of spectator sports, especially on television; it keeps the riffraff off the trout streams.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-05-2011, 02:51 PM
duckypaddler's Avatar
duckypaddler duckypaddler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
Posts: 1,182
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flat Fly n View Post
Some say you can actually swim to the bottom and out, but who could keep there head in the game at time like that? I couldn't.

In a recirculating hydraulic if you are properly trained you may be able to swim to the bottom & out. I took a swiftwater rescue class where we jumped in on purpose to did just that. Most people like myself got 3 or so spins before you can catch the green (downstream) water. Just getting your fingers to penetrate what feels like a solid concrete wall into this water was enough to grab and pull you out. One guy got 7 or 9 spins, and another guy had to be rescued from the instructor. I'm glad I did it and it made me less scared of recirculating hydraulics, but the next year I just took pictures as the others did it.

In a weir dam the force or water slams you into the concrete (or rocks in this case) leaving no green water as an escape route even if you knew what you were doing. The only thing that might help is the newer design where some of the water since it falls on the rock cages is sieved out which is supposed to make it easier to walk out, but I bet it would still kill you most of the time. In my opinion jumping off Elk River Falls (60 feet) into the pool below would be much safer. Not that I would recommend that either.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:10 PM
fourx's Avatar
fourx fourx is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Knoxville
Posts: 226
Default

This is what is called "Canadian Mist'ed". We all drowned.

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-05-2011, 11:20 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,202
Default

Sure it can be done. I have done it a bunch, and you may have been in my boat on the trip over the weir. IMO there are better floats to do and much less trouble then sliding boats over dry land to launch, and then riding over the weir.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-06-2011, 10:14 PM
Trico Trico is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 118
Default

One question leads to another. The reason I inquired about floating from the dam to the weir is it is my understanding this section is the only section worth fishing in the late fall and winter or is this bad information. Perhaps Rodonthefly or Waterwolf or someone with experienced in fishing the Clinch can shed some light on this.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-06-2011, 10:51 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trico View Post
One question leads to another. The reason I inquired about floating from the dam to the weir is it is my understanding this section is the only section worth fishing in the late fall and winter or is this bad information. Perhaps Rodonthefly or Waterwolf or someone with experienced in fishing the Clinch can shed some light on this.
Bad info, the whole river fishes well year round. There has always been this urban legend that the upper river fishes better in the winter because the fish run upstream to spawn. Totally BS from what I have experienced. There is spawning going on all over the river, and the fishing down river stays the same no matter what the calendar says.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-07-2011, 10:46 AM
Trico Trico is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 118
Default

Waterwolf, thanks very much for your reply.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:47 AM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.