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Old 08-12-2013, 09:46 PM
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The-Sasquatch The-Sasquatch is offline
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Default Orange Soft Hackles

In planning for my trip down there in October, many of you said that orange dries work great. It got me thinking. Do any of you fish with soft hackles? If so, one of my favorite small-stream techniques is to trail a soft hackle behind a dry. I googled "orange soft hackle" and this youtube video came up. Simple, easy pattern. I really enjoy fishing w/ wets like this, though. Especially on glass rods!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxOMNdTYoAY
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:01 PM
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Never tried that particular approach, but in spring I fish a quill Gordon wet behind a dry it worked phenomenally so I bet it will work great
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:10 PM
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Do you guys have a good QG hatch? Unfortunately in PA the hatch has become very obscure. We caught it this year in the north central portion of the state, but it's not nearly as wide spread as it used to be (according to legend!)
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:40 PM
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It depends on the year. Sometimes the water is still cold enough that the fish don't turn on to them. But mid feb can be awesome.
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:03 AM
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I fish them and they work spectacular if you want a change of pace.

See this video I shot a few years back fishing them on the Clinch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2J-sTfl8fco

The audio is horrible; but, you can get the general idea on how to fish them.

Bump, bump or a one-two rhythm...! Not Strip, strip-although it looks like I am doing this in the video. I slow bump it in slow moving water and fast bump it in fast moving water. I vary the technique depending on the barometric and water temperature readings.
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:12 AM
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I use them hardcore in the last year or so, depending on the the water type and time of year, yellow when sulphers are on, brown the majority of the other times. I have not done as well with the orange, but that could be me. As Madison says above it's the motion in the ocean that attracts the hits for me, with a little practice to hone the bug movement in the water you should do okay, as with anything it's just another arrow in the quiver on any day!
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Old 08-13-2013, 12:00 PM
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With call coming up the October caddis will be hatching and an orange wet should be perfect. I usually add a split shot to the leader and high stick in the riffles and heads of pools. Lynn
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:38 PM
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I like to fish two of them in tandem, or as a dropper in some type of nymph rig. I have started adding soft hackles to some of my traditional nymph patterns as well. I like to use silk thread and floss for them. It looks a little different than one tied with traditional thread when it gets wet. I tie mine almost like the you tube video except I strip all of the fibers off of one side of the feather. The video didn't mention the orientation of the feather when you tie it in. You need to work with the natural cure in the feather. Tie in the feather with the shiny side facing forward, it will use the natural curve in the fibers and make them curve backwards. I also like to add just a small ball of dubbing for a thorax. I primarily fish them using the Leisering lift.
http://frontrangeanglers.com/newslet...enringlift.htm

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Last edited by flyman; 08-15-2013 at 12:54 PM.. Reason: 42
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Old 08-15-2013, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyman View Post
I like to fish two of them in tandem, or as a dropper in some type of nymph rig. I have started adding soft hackles to some of my traditional nymph patterns as well. I like to use silk thread and floss for them. It looks a little different than one tied with traditional thread when it gets wet. I tie mine almost like the you tube video except I strip all of the fibers off of one side of the feather. The video didn't mention the orientation of the feather when you tie it in. You need to work with the natural cure in the feather. Tie in the feather with the shiny side facing forward, it will use the natural curve in the fibers and make them curve backwards. I also like to add just a small ball of dubbing for a thorax. I primarily fish them using the Leisering lift.
http://frontrangeanglers.com/newslet...enringlift.htm

Agree with all this , they fish much better I have found when tied with silk, I use Pearsall silk from England The Leisering lift is a killer method especially when there is caddis emerging .
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyman View Post
I like to fish two of them in tandem, or as a dropper in some type of nymph rig. I have started adding soft hackles to some of my traditional nymph patterns as well. I like to use silk thread and floss for them. It looks a little different than one tied with traditional thread when it gets wet. I tie mine almost like the you tube video except I strip all of the fibers off of one side of the feather. The video didn't mention the orientation of the feather when you tie it in. You need to work with the natural cure in the feather. Tie in the feather with the shiny side facing forward, it will use the natural curve in the fibers and make them curve backwards. I also like to add just a small ball of dubbing for a thorax. I primarily fish them using the Leisering lift.
http://frontrangeanglers.com/newslet...enringlift.htm

Thanks Flyman

This kind of info can really help myself out. On tail waters, I always see people successfully swinging soft hackles. Unfortunately I haven't been one of them This technique should be much better than my - let it dead drift as long as I can than swing it once you can't keep good drift I knew I was missing something.
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