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Old 02-08-2008, 06:12 PM
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Rog 1 Rog 1 is offline
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Default Real Old Time Fishing

Back when I first started fishing in the Park I could usually count on seeing several local oldtimers every year fishing with nothing more than a cane pole and a piece of mono with a fly of choice on the end...they would move behind rocks and trees and simply high stick the fly through a pool...more times than not they would easily outfish those city boys in their waders and glass rods....have often thought about giving this a try sometime and wondering if anyone out there has ever used this method...I am bored and want to go fishing.......
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Old 02-08-2008, 06:22 PM
Byron Begley Byron Begley is offline
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I know people who fish with mono using a fly rod. One is Ted Myers who works here at the shop. Ted has been fishing the mountains over 50 years. Another is Ray Ball. He is another excellent fisherman who uses mono. He has been fishing here over 50 years too. I imagine both started with a cane pole. Ray Will be tying here February 16th. You should be here for that. Since Ray and Ted are good friends Ted should be here too though he usually doesn't work on Saturdays.

Byron
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Old 02-11-2008, 12:00 AM
snaildarter snaildarter is offline
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A buddy of mine in Waynesville does something similar. He has been flyfishing the NC side for over 30 years, and is a spectacularly good fisherman. He does use a fly rod and line. However, when we fish together, he uses only the leader a large amount of the time. If the stream conditions get tight, he may do it exclusively. Not only does he do a traditional cane pole drift, he will also do a cast whereby he only has the leader out, but pinches the fly in one hand, pulls it back, aims it like a bow and arrow, and lets go. He could probably knock the wing off a floating mayfly with this technique, all the while avoiding any branches or other overhead problems. And it's good out to about 20 feet (9' rod, 7.5' leader, few feet of fly line, few feet of arm length).

Watching his effectiveness, and comparing it with my own trying to use a 6' rod in tight conditions, made me give up my short rod, which has now sat unused for about 10 years. I can see some kind of tight, tunnel-like, long, still pool, where I would rather have the 6 footer, but I know of few streams that are really like that for long stretches. Now, the tighter the stream, the longer I want my rod to be.
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Old 02-11-2008, 12:37 AM
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ijsouth ijsouth is offline
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That's pretty much how I fish a lot of the time, too...occasionally, I make what would be considered a "real" cast, but most of the time, I just have a little bit of fly line off the end of the rod, and sometimes not even that.
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Old 02-11-2008, 09:45 AM
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This would seem to negate the effectiveness of all the new rod technologies and $100 fly lines for the majority of the water in the Park....guess the oldtimers really knew what they were doing.....even after my grandfather graduated to fiberglass he always went with the 9 ft rods .... even on the smallest of streams....
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:41 PM
tennswede tennswede is offline
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Interesting discussion. I actually fished my first summer here in the park with a fiberglass 12 ft crappie pole from Kmart. I ited a level mono with a bushy dry fly on to the tip top and swung it out. I caught my first Rainbows on West Prong of Little Pigeon this way. My equipment cost me about $25 dollars. Rod, mono line, and a dozen flies. Those were the days.
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Old 02-11-2008, 10:04 PM
pineman19 pineman19 is offline
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Hans,

Thats cool, but please don't bring a crappie pole on our backcountry trip to Hazel this spring. I would never live down the embarassment of being outfished by reformed panfisher.
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Old 02-13-2008, 10:46 AM
tennswede tennswede is offline
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Homemade wading staff. $10 crappie pole do I need to say more!!!
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Old 02-13-2008, 01:11 PM
Hal M Hal M is offline
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Default Old Time Fishing

I reccommend the book by Jim Gasque titled "Hunting & Fishing in the Great Smokies. It is no longer in print but Jim Casada had some copies for sale. It tells about Mark Cathey. I think you will really enjoy it.

Hal
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Old 02-13-2008, 02:53 PM
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old tom old tom is offline
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I too love this kind of fishing. But I have trouble with the hook set. What do you do when you're dappling over a rock, under a rhododendron canopy and you've got about 2 or 3 feet between the water and a limb? Or am I just trying to fish in a place that God didn't intend for me to fish?
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