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  #91  
Old 06-01-2010, 06:11 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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Grannyknot--The Mason book was published many decades ago (I think 1927 is the date but that's from memory and may be off a bit). It is moderately rare (value in the $100 range). Brown's biography of the Park is much more recent (last decade or so) and shouldn't be too difficult to find. It is admirably researched and in my view the single most useful treatment of Park history. There are some glitches, as is inevitable in a book of its scope and depth, but I consider it a masterful work. She obviously spent a great deal of time in Park archives and I admire the fact that she doesn't hesitate to criticize the Park when criticism is merited. It is a fine piece of academic history, and as someone who labored in the vineyards of academe for a quarter of a century (and as a historian) I think I've got a decent grasp of such things. I don't know Dr. Brown personally although we have exchanged e-mails.
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  #92  
Old 06-01-2010, 06:12 PM
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My current favorite is Mr. Cassada's, "Insider's Guide to a Pursuit of Passion". I especially like the peronal touch of his own experiences and historic references to others from the region.

On the Spine of Time, by Middleton is also a personal favorite and is also from whence I obtained my signature line

Last but not least the Traver's Corner series by Scott Waldie are the kind of books that are awfully hard to put down once ya pick them up!

Mike
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  #93  
Old 06-01-2010, 07:13 PM
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Way off topic, I am reading Bring Em Back Alive-Frank Buck's adventures capturing wild animals, cobras ,and pythons.
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  #94  
Old 06-01-2010, 07:35 PM
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Due to a prolonged illness a while back, I spent way more time reading about fishing than fishing for several years, and for good or bad have read the majority of books and authors mentioned so far;

Gierach will always be my favorite, especially "The Fishing Car" story in his View from Rat Lake, and I also really like James Prosek (didn't he write a story about fishing in Townsend?), but if I had to pick just one book that really struck a chord, it would be Chris Camuto's "A Flyfisherman's Blue Ridge" (as much as I hate his politics)

Wayne
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  #95  
Old 06-01-2010, 08:45 PM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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Rivergal--If you like Frank Buck, you need to read about Buffalo Jones and maybe some of the hair-raising accounts of Jim Corbett or J. H. Patterson--way off topic, to be sure, but still books and authors with an outdoor thrust. Jim Casada
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  #96  
Old 06-01-2010, 08:59 PM
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margaret brown's excellent book, the wild east, is still available in the park stores. i met her at the 2009 wildflower pilgrimage (along with dan pierce and harvey broome)....she is also a contributor to the brown book ... the hiking bible for the park.
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  #97  
Old 06-02-2010, 06:33 AM
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Jim-Thanks for the book suggestions-Corbett's Temple Tiger is next on my list
of armchair adventures.
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  #98  
Old 06-02-2010, 07:33 AM
Jim Casada Jim Casada is offline
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Sam--I think the "hiking bible" for the Park which you mention refers to the GSMNA work on the subject. If you mean the one where there are a number of contributors, I would have to disagree. Certain sections of the book are full of errors. My brother is an avid and accomplished hiker and he keeps meticulous records, including GPS information, on his hikes. In the last two years he has walked virtually every mile of every trail in the Park. He says that on some trails the guide is so far off that he has to wonder whether the author for that section had ever been on the trail. If you want specifics I can get them from him, and its possible you have a different book in mind. However, I did want to mention the matter and, if nothing else, get clarification.
In my view there is no book on Park trails which even comes close to Ken Wise's Hiking Trails of the great Smoky Mountains National Park. It is, sadly, out of print, but some index to its merits is provided by the fact that copies sell in the $150-$200 range on the out-of-print market. He is well into a revised and updated version of the book and it is something every hiker and fisherman should keep an eye out for.
I thought I remembered seeing Brown's book in one of the visitor centers during a recent "browse," but I didn't want to say for certain. The book holds a cherished spot on my shelves. It wouldn't have been Harvey Broome you met in 2009. A Knoxville lawyer, he died way back in 1968. The Knoxville chapter of the Sierra Club is named for him, I believe, and his wife and some friends put together a posthumous book which honors him. The title, if memory serves, is Harvey Broome: Earth Man.
Jim Casada
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  #99  
Old 06-02-2010, 09:45 AM
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old east tn boy old east tn boy is offline
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"What Fly Fishing Teaches Us", a fly fishing photography book by Denver Bryan in the genre of coffee table texts. The publisher is Willow Creek Press dated 2006. A smallish book with beautiful pictures supported by a few lines of text to support the content in the photo, it can set one to day dreaming within the first dozen pages. I have only seen one, which I purchased, in an antique shop in Sweetwater.
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  #100  
Old 06-02-2010, 08:48 PM
knoxrod knoxrod is offline
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I am not seeing the love for Corey Ford and the Lower Forty Shooting, Angling and Inside Straight Club of Hardscrabble, USA as appeared in Field and Stream when I was a youth. I am fortunate enough to have a copy of his reprinted works issued by the Trustees of Dartmouth College in 1987. i believe Corey Ford died in 1969. Also, another favorite of mine while growing up was Robert Roark's Old Man and the Boy and its sequel.
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