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Thread: new rod questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    west tn
    Posts
    236

    Default new rod questions

    Before I start dropping hint to the wife about the new Helios 3 as a christmas present, I have a few questions. As I was talking with a sales rep from orvis he states that the 5 weight would suffice for fishing in the smokies streams. To my understanding a 5 weight may be a little too heavy for the small flies of the smokies, but he assured me it would be fine. I could see using it on larger tailwaters, but small streams? I though a 3 or 4 weight would be ideal for the smokies. Whats everyones input? Thank for the info!! Flyguys

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    900

    Default

    I fish a couple of 3 wt rods in the smaller streams, I have 4 weight lines on them to turn over the shorter distance casting easily, with a 5 wt bamboo, no problems at all. That's what works for me.

    Grumpy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Norris, TN
    Posts
    2,183

    Default

    A 5 wt will work fine. The key is having two-different spools of line to switch from tailwaters to freestone streams. Rig up your freestone with a short-length spool designed for the tighter streams.
    “Every human has four endowments- self awareness, conscience, independent will, & creative imagination.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Knoxville
    Posts
    316

    Default

    Will a 5 weight work? Sure. I have a couple of Far and Fines I use occasionally in the park. But I find my go to rod is a 3 weight. I also fish 4's. For me the lighter rods are more fun, but if all I had was a 5, then that's what I would use.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    167

    Default

    No reason it wouldn't. On occasion, I use a 6 wt, like when the water is up and I'm going to be fishing HEAVY nymphs or streamers. It will work if you make it work!

    Jim Parks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Townsend, TN
    Posts
    126

    Default

    Remember, you are only casting a few feet in most of the small streams in the park. I have used several different rods of varying weights and it doesn't seem to matter what line weight I pair them with. Now if I were to make long casts in a more traditional way, it would be a different story. I would go ahead and get the 5 wt rod and pair it with a 4 wt line if I wanted a 4 wt. It will work fine.
    Joe

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Knoxville
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Fishing in the park with my best tailwater rod would make me nervous. If I break a tip I'm out of commission until I can get it fixed. Any expensive rod for that matter, although they all have lifetime warranties, those warranties aren't free like they used to be. I haven't ever broken a rod in the park but seem to snag a tree limb, slip and fall, or otherwise endanger the rod every time. If I'm going to do a lot of nymphing I like my old Cabelas 8'6" 5 wt., if I'm going to fish mostly dries I like my old Lamiglass 7' 3 wt. Both rods are what would now be considered medium action ( they were medium/fast when I bought them) which gives a nice bend and fight to smaller fish. ( well after thinking about it, if I break one of those old rods, no warranty, unable to get replacement sections, it will cost me more to replace with another cheaper rod than the warranty charge ($30-100) for a new high-end stick. I need a cheaper rod with a lifetime warranty and very low warranty charge...)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Maynardville, TN
    Posts
    140

    Default

    If you're set on the H3 at least get their 3F 5wt. Not supposed to be as fast as their other series. But if you're not set on the H3 you could try their superfine carbon. It's a great mountain rod. Mine is a 9' 4wt, It's not a wet noodle by any means, but it's not a sage one either lmao I fish a pretty fast, good shooting 5wt line on mine at all times, park or tailwater. It's basically moved into the spot as my favorite tailwater rod. Unless it's stupid windy. And it Doesn't have the backbone to move big fish per say but it does really well protecting light tippet.

    As far as a cheap rod with a good warranty and fishes pretty darn well is a redington classic trout. They're always on sale and they cast pretty well at that.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maryville
    Posts
    1,140

    Default

    If I wanted a "do all" Smoky's rod, I'd buy a 9' 4-weight. It'd do fine for fishing dries, nymphs, and small streamers. But, I don't, so I have an 8'9" 3-weight for dries and a 9' 5-weight for big nymphs and streamers. I find myself fishing the 5-weight most often and concentrating on brown trout water in the park.
    My posts are worthless without pictures

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    167

    Default

    If you're considering a 1 rod for all, I'd go with the 5 wt. I tend to use a 4 wt in both the mountains and tailwaters. I've landed 28" trout on a 4 wt using 7X on a tailwater, so it can be done with patience and luck. I believe the "feel" of the lighter 4wt helps me land big fish on light tippet (maybe just imagination). I also feel very comfortable with a fighting large fish in the Smokies on a 4 wt. I don't lose them for lack of a stronger rod. However, I personally wouldn't go any lighter than a 4 wt, but then again I tend to fish the larger waters of the Park. I'll pull out the 6 wt if I plan on using streamers much or if I'm in the open on a windy day.

    Just my preference.

    Jim Parks

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