Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: holster river

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    maryville
    Posts
    549

    Default holster river

    Does anyone know if they have been stocking the holster yet this fall? I know other tail waters have been stocked but haven't heard about the holsten...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,351

    Default

    Bad time of year to be on the Holston, as this is when the water temps are usually the highest and fish mortality can be really high as well.

    Usually they start stocking in December, but sometimes it won't come until Feb.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    maryville
    Posts
    549

    Default

    Man I've seen people post about the water Temps from August till now always saying "nows the worse time" or something similar. No way in the 3rd week of November is the water at its highest temp of the year... possibly you'd like to float it by yourself, I get that, but the water cannot and will not be over 67 degrees next week on the hokston. I'll gladly take a temp mid day and post it if I go there.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    265

    Default

    The stocking schedule every year says they start in November. Same this year. It's been 28 degrees 3 days on my drive home at 6am recently..... I doubt the water is gona be too warm unless there's a 60 degree difference between Gatlinburg and Jefferson City. No excuse....."the lake turned over" Bla Bla Bla can validate that right now the water temps are too warm.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    944

    Default

    I guess this will now be our annual lake turnover education thread.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    maryville
    Posts
    549

    Default

    We fished Cherokee last week the surface temperature was in the upper 60's. Even if the water in the lake turned over there is no way that it is above the upper 60's unless it somehow got warmer as it moves to the bottom of the lake. Feel free to educate me on the thermodynamics of water as it gets warmer as the lake turns over I still disagree with water wolf

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Knoxville
    Posts
    277

    Default

    Water temperatures in the high sixties are very bad for trout. Sure, they can survive but not after the ordeal of being caught and released. Water with water temperatures over 65 degrees holds much less DO and the combination of high temperatures and low DO will kill fish that have been caught.

    Most guides who depend on a fishery to make their living will not fish on a particular river if the water temps are over 65 degrees. The financial gain from a trip is far outweighed by the damage done to the fishery.

    I've seen years when the Holston didn't cool till middle December. It all depends on lake turnover, which occurs when the surface temperatures of the lake fall below the temperature near the bottom. The top and bottom will swap places and this is usually a welcomed event for temperature challenged tailwaters. I'd imagine Cherokee Lake has NOT turned over yet. We've really not had that much cold weather. It takes more than a few cool nights....think a few weeks of cold and daily frosts.

    Of course I can't confirm if it's turned yet or not because we've kept off of it in hopes that it will fish like it did a few years back.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    576

    Default

    I fished the Clinch a week ago Tuesday and the water temps were 65 at Millers. I know we're talking the Holsten. So take it for what it's worth. Although the cooler temps and rain in recent days surely have helped.
    Lynn

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Norris, TN
    Posts
    2,185

    Default

    Keep in mind when reading temperatures on tail-waters that conditions are dynamic. That is; water flows (cfs), sunlight, rain, and air temperature have the greatest affect on a river's thermocline. I believe Jim may(?) be alluding to the baseline water temperature when the river is at it's average flow. In my opinion, during non-releases, the river is more apt to change temperature at different rates as compared to average flow temperature.

    This is something I pay particular attention to in identifying macro and fish feeding habits on the Clinch. Also, there is the helical flow as well. That basically tells you were the fish reside during flows.

    All of the this information in my post are just things I pay attention to and have discovered. That is the beauty of this sport in that it makes us arm-char specialists in all of science in not just fly fishing.

    It is always good to discuss topics like this and trade ideas.
    “Every human has four endowments- self awareness, conscience, independent will, & creative imagination.
    These give us the ultimate human freedom... The
    power
    to choose, to respond, to change.”



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,351

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2weightfavorite View Post
    Man I've seen people post about the water Temps from August till now always saying "nows the worse time" or something similar. No way in the 3rd week of November is the water at its highest temp of the year... possibly you'd like to float it by yourself, I get that, but the water cannot and will not be over 67 degrees next week on the hokston. I'll gladly take a temp mid day and post it if I go there.
    I'm not fishing this time of year and could careless if there's 1000 people on the river. After lake turnover the rivers reach the highest temps and lowest DO levels of the year, that's a fact

    Water temps in the upper 60's are dangerous to trout survival if fishing pressure is involved. Add in lake turnover and poorly oxygenated water and its a tough time

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •