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Thread: 1st Post. Looking for some GSMNP fishing advice from the seasoned veterans.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    163

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    David, how far above the nymph do you place the split shot? I'm always worried that the presence of split shot will somehow spook the fish. Also, if you're not sight fishing, how hard is it to detect the take with no indicator. I'm guessing this technique lends itself to relatively short casts and longer rods to be effective. Thanks for your and Jim's insights...I love these discussions.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Crossville, TN
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    2,432

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoelO View Post
    David, how far above the nymph do you place the split shot? I'm always worried that the presence of split shot will somehow spook the fish. Also, if you're not sight fishing, how hard is it to detect the take with no indicator. I'm guessing this technique lends itself to relatively short casts and longer rods to be effective. Thanks for your and Jim's insights...I love these discussions.
    I generally add shot around 6-10" from the fly or flies. Split shot typically won't spook fish too much in the Smokies, but I have fished in places where it will.

    As far as seeing the strike without an indicator, it really isn't hard. Try using a sighter of indicator tippet to make it even easier...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    183

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    Over the years, I've learned that the hardest thing to teach is strike detection. Fishermen coming from spin fishing are waiting to feel the strike. With “high-sticking”, you MUST control the amount of line you’re fishing with and a longer rod does help with line pick up. A good start is to use the line (Fly Line & leader combined) the same length of your rod. With time, the amount of line you can “control” grows. Mistake #1 is lowering your rod tip allowing slack in your line. With slack, when you get a strike you’ll either never know it, or miss it because of the slack in your line. The action of the fish’s strike in the line is absorbed by the slack and you never see movement in your leader. I’ve said “lift your rod” thousands of times when teaching newbies! Eventually, strike detection becomes automatic when there’s a sudden & sharp “twitch” in the line. Another consideration is position. If you’re positioned such that glare off the water blinds you from being able to watch your line, you’ll miss a lot. That’s where some form of strike indication comes in handy.

    Euro-nymphing focuses more on slightly pulling your flies to keep your line tight. This can also be done with your basic high-sticking with fly line . I’ve seen it done effectively. Still, I work more toward a dead drift using the weight of the flies to sink to the level I want AND as a little “resistance” against any pull I may create in keeping the line tight. I like high-sticking over euro style in the Smokies simply because it’s easier for me to cast in the tighter environment with the added weight of the fly line.

    I hope this makes sense and isn’t too wordy.

    Jim Parks

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Franklin, TN
    Posts
    163

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    Jim, no, not too wordy. I like the details...the details help eliminate confusion. It sounds like I need to a) use a longer rod ...currently using an 8 ft 4 wt., b) get closer to the target given the amount of line I can effectively control using this technique and c) get ninja stealthy.

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