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Thread: Dying Fly Line

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Townsend, TN
    Posts
    131

    Default Dying Fly Line

    Here it is Memorial Day weekend. Of course I am not going to venture out into the Park to fish today. I will leave the Park to the tourists this weekend. That's what the Park is all about anyway. People from other places should enjoy the Park as do the locals. So, instead of fishing, I have come up with an interesting project. First off, there is a never ending controversy among fly fisher persons as to whether bright colored fly lines will be detrimental to trout fishing. I am of the school that I don't really think it makes much difference, but the dull colored fly line guys do have a good argument. We have enough obstacles in the way of successful fishing such as bad weather, high water, murky water, otters, tubers, toe wetters, etc., so why not eliminate an obstacle if we can. I have several lines that are white, bright yellow, and a few other non natural colors. I bought some dark green RIT fabric dye from the IGA and found some directions on dying fly line on the internet. They turned out great. I now have lines that are dull green, brown, and dull grey. About an hours work and all of my lines are now obscure.
    Joe
    Last edited by xvigauge; 05-26-2019 at 05:01 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    NC side of the Smokies
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Good idea. I have no idea why every fly line you can buy is some ungodly bright neon color. I guess they match those neon professional fly-fisherman shirts and look good in photos. I have no doubt they spook fish-I've seen it many times. I've threatened to take a couple hours one day when I'm bored and camo one with sharpie markers.
    Specks: the other pink meat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,351

    Default

    First, I’m of the school that it doesn’t make one dang difference the color line. The shadow and slap is far more important than the color from my experience.

    second, I’ve dyed fly lines before. We used black rit die because as young pup fishers we were convinced we could do better. First day out with the stealth line started with much excitement. However it quickly turned to frustration as the black completely became invisible when it hit the water. Knowing when to mend was impossible and the entire experiment was a joke. My advice don’t dye them black

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    900

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by waterwolf View Post
    First, Iím of the school that it doesnít make one dang difference the color line. The shadow and slap is far more important than the color from my experience.
    totally agree, the only time I've been able to use dark lines was while floating, standing up where I could see it. I haven't used one in years though, something about getting older

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Townsend, TN
    Posts
    131

    Default

    I always use a strike indicator on my leader and my line is rarely in the water anyway with my high stick method of nymph fishing, so as far as the line goes, I think I will see it. Because of the dark green dye (not black) most of the lines I dyed turned out to be an an olive color (dull green) which is what many of my lines that are not dyed are anyway. The orange lines are now a light brown and the white ones are a light grey. I am more concerned with fish seeing the bright lines as I approach the water, not while the lines are in the water. We all know that bright and colorful clothing can give the trout lockjaw, I believe it is possible that bright lines can too.
    Joe
    Last edited by xvigauge; 05-29-2019 at 12:19 PM. Reason: grammar

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