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Thread: Go To Patterns

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    183

    Default Go To Patterns

    I've been recovering from foot surgery from a fall roughly 17 yrs ago while fishing above Elkmont. Who says fly fishing is a gentle sport! Needless to say, I'm not one to sit around, thought I've been forced to a bit the past 2 months. My wife says I'm a cross between Indiana Jones & the Energizer Bunny. Anyway, I've spent a lot of time tying my assortment of patterns I use throughout the year. I've kept records of every trip I've been on since 1989 and deem a lot of information on what has worked for me the past 31 years.

    So, here's my question...... What are YOUR "Go To" flies? Your 3 or 4 that you find yourself using and tying to restock your supply that have caught you the most trout in the Smokies.

    I'll start, no particular order

    Guinea Fly
    Grampus
    Greenie Weenie
    Crow Fly


    Jim Parks aka Grampus
    Tails Of The Smokies

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Knoxville
    Posts
    339

    Default

    My favorite summer time rig is a yellow stimulator dry with a green weenie dropper.

    As far as other go to Smokies flies:

    Parachute Adams
    Yellow Neversink
    Yellow Sally

    Beadhead Pheasant tails
    Tellico Nymphs
    Gold ribbed Hares Ear
    Green weenie

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Fellows, at this time of the year I almost always use a nymph as the point fly, (top one) and the Smoky Mountain Blackbird Softhackle as the Dropper. I do use the dry version of the Quill Gordon and the wet as a dropper, if they seem to be feeding on top.
    In the Middle of Summer the Stimulator is hard to beat with a Green Weenie as the Dropper. As the water gets warmer I tend to use a Smoky Mountain Blackbird lightly weighted by itself and fish the riffles. It can really produce.

    Ginseng Man
    Hugh Hartsell

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Townsend, TN
    Posts
    134

    Default

    For those who may not be familiar with all of the above listed patterns, it would be nice to see a few photos of them.
    Joe

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    183

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GinsengMan View Post
    Fellows, at this time of the year I almost always use a nymph as the point fly, (top one) and the Smoky Mountain Blackbird Softhackle as the Dropper. I do use the dry version of the Quill Gordon and the wet as a dropper, if they seem to be feeding on top.
    In the Middle of Summer the Stimulator is hard to beat with a Green Weenie as the Dropper. As the water gets warmer I tend to use a Smoky Mountain Blackbird lightly weighted by itself and fish the riffles. It can really produce.

    Ginseng Man
    Hugh Hartsell

    Hugh,

    For your blackbird soft hackle, what do you use for the "soft" hackle? For the crow fly, I use the short side of the split wing feathers, but that doesn't give me a soft hackle.

    Jim Parks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    183

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xvigauge View Post
    For those who may not be familiar with all of the above listed patterns, it would be nice to see a few photos of them.
    Joe
    Look me up on Instagram and you will see the patterns. It's A LOT easier to load images there than on this forum

    My Instagram account is TailOfTheSmokies or Jim Parks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kodak, TN
    Posts
    183

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JayR View Post
    My favorite summer time rig is a yellow stimulator dry with a green weenie dropper.

    As far as other go to Smokies flies:

    Parachute Adams
    Yellow Neversink
    Yellow Sally

    Beadhead Pheasant tails
    Tellico Nymphs
    Gold ribbed Hares Ear
    Green weenie
    JayR,
    When yellow is working well, try a "Yellow Grizzly" nymph, which is simply a yellow body with a grizzly hackle palmered back to front. I use a #8 weighted. I'll take a photo of it and put it on my Instagram page later today.

    Jim Parks
    TailsOfTheSmokies

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Knoxville
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grampus View Post
    JayR,
    When yellow is working well, try a "Yellow Grizzly" nymph, which is simply a yellow body with a grizzly hackle palmered back to front. I use a #8 weighted. I'll take a photo of it and put it on my Instagram page later today.

    Jim Parks
    TailsOfTheSmokies

    Yes, please do.

    I would really like to see the guinea fowl. Is this supposed to mimic the black stone fly?

    Thanks!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Jim, There are several feathers on a Starling skin that can be used but the ones at the top of the shoulders are perfect for tying a Softhackle fly. The hackle stem is small, but strong enough to wrap 3 good wraps and that gives the fly some float ability. Most Softhackle flies only need about 1-1/2 or two turns of hackle to make a cover. This particular fly is weighted enough to get it down deep, but 3 turns of Starling makes it buoyant and it rises and falls in the current as it comes back downstream. You can watch one in a shallow run and see just what it does. I always strip on side off before wrapping. I can't post pictures or I would show. Maybe links will work. I will try this link to Facebook if you are a member on there you may have to make a "Friend Request." They are on my Profile Page and the Main Page right now.

    Ginseng Man
    Hugh Hartsell
    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100008848629833
    Last edited by GinsengMan; 03-11-2020 at 03:19 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Jim, There are several feathers on a Starling skin that can be used but the ones at the top of the shoulders are perfect for tying a Softhackle fly. The hackle stem is small, but strong enough to wrap 3 good wraps and that gives the fly some float ability. Most Softhackle flies only need about 1-1/2 or two turns of hackle to make a cover. This particular fly is weighted enough to get it down deep, but 3 turns of Starling makes it buoyant and it rises and falls in the current as it comes back downstream. You can watch one in a shallow run and see just what it does. I always strip on side off before wrapping. I can't post pictures or I would show. Maybe links will work.

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