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Thread: RIP John

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Knoxville, TN
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    948

    Default RIP John

    Sad to say that John Thurman passed away this morning.
    I know he helped make a lot of our lives better and did a lot for the clinch river and its anglers.
    Will be missed.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    SE Tennessee
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    Thanks for the info. Thoughts and prayers for the family.
    John Torchick

  3. #3
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    Jun 2008
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    A fine man who I traveled with all over and also taught me so much about this sport

  4. #4
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    Mar 2006
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    17

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    “To him, all good things - trout as well as eternal salvation - came by grace; and grace comes by art; and art does not come easy”
    ―*Norman Maclean

    Indeed Rest in Peace

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Great Smoky Mountains
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    One of my favorite pictures of John Thurman [far right] on "Kids Fish Free Day" on the Clinch about 6 years ago. John and I were volunteers that day as John had done for years. I asked him to take my friend's son Weston out and help him on his first time ever with a fly rod. John helped him hook his first fish and hooked him on fly fishing. Weston later went to Trout Camp which John helped pioneer and also was a winner in a round of the first "Iron Man Fly Contest".
    All because one man on a beautiful Saturday morning took a moment in his life to share his love for helping a young angler feel that first trout on a fly line. An honorable man who led a life of serving and giving and best of all a fine sportsman. God bless.
    Last edited by bigsur; 10-21-2020 at 10:05 PM.
    "It starts with a raindrop, don't let it end with a teardrop!"

    "Nothing straightens out my mind like a twisting mountain stream!"

    Follow the Great Smoky Mountain Trout Unlimited website:

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    "A true conservationist is someone who knows that the world is not given by their fathers, but borrowed from their children."

  6. #6
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    Jun 2008
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    I didn’t really have the words earlier as I was still facing this hard reality that a man I grew up with, whose daughter baby sat me, and who taught me how to tie flies along with so much more had just passed.

    growing up in Norris the Thurmans were close friends of my parents and when I started fly fishing John did so much to help me out. At the time he had forsaken the clinch and really only travelled to fish. Slowly I convinced him to join me and we would often fish the clinch together and I remember him telling me how far it had come since the 70’s. At first he would wade early with me throwing streamers in the fog and caught countless quality fish using a sinking line a leech pattern. Over time he adopted the indicator nymph world, and became a master of that technique.

    he introduced me to grouse hunting in our mountains along the way. So many great memories of rugged long hikes, and dead grouse in our vests. The sport he introduced me to has changed but the memories and places remain. A hunt with John was survival as he could out walk anyone and loved a long day on a mountain side watching his dogs.

    I had the pleasure of traveling several times to his home waters in Wisconsin to fish pasture spring creeks. Fishing black earth creek or storey creek with him was such a great experience. Remembering those evenings after a long day on the creeks with an Old Style and a bag of cheese curds is something I’ll never forget.

    we traveled several falls to fish the bighorn during the trico hatch, and some of the days we had stalking back channel browns sipping spinners will be some of my favorite memories. The day he hooked the calf on a back cast will always bring a laugh, or he and I getting washed downstream after trying to cross water that was way too big will as well. Many nights on these trips we huddled in his camper rental at Cottonwood Camp tying flies for the next day over a few cold beers and occasional cigar.

    there were also the trips to the Deschutes in Oregon along with countless other streams in the area. Walking in miles with him discussing our tactics, the mule deer, or rattlesnake we had just encountered before separating to try our hand at the native red side rainbows.

    For me John, was someone who taught me so much, introduced me to more, and was part of my childhood through my adult hood. My family and his have shared thanksgiving dinners, Fourth of July parties, Christmas parties, and so much more.

    I was lucky to visit with him last week, and while he was in bad shape we still had a great visit and had the chance to discuss so much.

    this hits hard, and I will sorely miss a mentor, teacher, and great friend. I just hope he’s standing in a spring creek somewhere, the clinch, out west, or staring at a dog on point. John lived life perfectly, and also treated other people better than anyone I know.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Norris, TN
    Posts
    2,196

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    Quote Originally Posted by waterwolf View Post
    I didnít really have the words earlier as I was still facing this hard reality that a man I grew up with, whose daughter baby sat me, and who taught me how to tie flies along with so much more had just passed.

    growing up in Norris the Thurmans were close friends of my parents and when I started fly fishing John did so much to help me out. At the time he had forsaken the clinch and really only travelled to fish. Slowly I convinced him to join me and we would often fish the clinch together and I remember him telling me how far it had come since the 70ís. At first he would wade early with me throwing streamers in the fog and caught countless quality fish using a sinking line a leech pattern. Over time he adopted the indicator nymph world, and became a master of that technique.

    he introduced me to grouse hunting in our mountains along the way. So many great memories of rugged long hikes, and dead grouse in our vests. The sport he introduced me to has changed but the memories and places remain. A hunt with John was survival as he could out walk anyone and loved a long day on a mountain side watching his dogs.

    I had the pleasure of traveling several times to his home waters in Wisconsin to fish pasture spring creeks. Fishing black earth creek or storey creek with him was such a great experience. Remembering those evenings after a long day on the creeks with an Old Style and a bag of cheese curds is something Iíll never forget.

    we traveled several falls to fish the bighorn during the trico hatch, and some of the days we had stalking back channel browns sipping spinners will be some of my favorite memories. The day he hooked the calf on a back cast will always bring a laugh, or he and I getting washed downstream after trying to cross water that was way too big will as well. Many nights on these trips we huddled in his camper rental at Cottonwood Camp tying flies for the next day over a few cold beers and occasional cigar.

    there were also the trips to the Deschutes in Oregon along with countless other streams in the area. Walking in miles with him discussing our tactics, the mule deer, or rattlesnake we had just encountered before separating to try our hand at the native red side rainbows.

    For me John, was someone who taught me so much, introduced me to more, and was part of my childhood through my adult hood. My family and his have shared thanksgiving dinners, Fourth of July parties, Christmas parties, and so much more.

    I was lucky to visit with him last week, and while he was in bad shape we still had a great visit and had the chance to discuss so much.

    this hits hard, and I will sorely miss a mentor, teacher, and great friend. I just hope heís standing in a spring creek somewhere, the clinch, out west, or staring at a dog on point. John lived life perfectly, and also treated other people better than anyone I know.

    Jim, what a fabulous tribute to John and your memories'. He was a great man and a fabulous ambassador for our sport! He was one of the few people that I would jump to help if it was John that asked me. I enjoyed his passion for sharing information and helping others. He left his mark on me and I expect many others! I send him a salute and rejoice in having him in my life!
    ďEvery human has four endowments- self awareness, conscience, independent will, & creative imagination.
    These give us the ultimate human freedom... The
    power
    to choose, to respond, to change



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterwolf View Post
    John lived life perfectly, and also treated other people better than anyone I know.
    Well said.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Great Smoky Mountains
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    960

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    If you want to send a card or letter to Kathy Thurman her P.O. box address is PO Box 546,* 546 Norris, TN* 37828
    "It starts with a raindrop, don't let it end with a teardrop!"

    "Nothing straightens out my mind like a twisting mountain stream!"

    Follow the Great Smoky Mountain Trout Unlimited website:

    http://greatsmokymountain.tu.org/

    FACEBOOK: http://m.facebook.com/GreatSmokyMountainTU/

    "A true conservationist is someone who knows that the world is not given by their fathers, but borrowed from their children."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    148

    Default

    I spent more days fishing and bird hunting as a companion to John than I did with anyone else over the last fifty years. All over the continent. No one could have Enjoyed a better companion than John.

    John was the most selfless person I have ever met. He would do anything to assist a friend , and likely a stranger, and expected no credit or acclaim for his generosity. In a world of "all about me" that we seem to see today, a person like John has sadly become a rarity. He would rather spend a day teaching some youngster or beginner to fly fish than to fish himself.

    There will be a memorial service for John in the near future. Im sure the good things and praise for John that will be said there could fill this forum topic. He simply is irreplaceable in our local flyfishing community.

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